Optimal methods for identifying depression following hospitalization for myocardial infarction

C. Barr Taylor, Robert F. DeBusk, Dennis M. Davidson, Nancy Houston, Kent Burnett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Methods for detecting depression were evaluated in 64 men mean age 53 ± 4 yr who underwent treadmill exercise testing 3 and 7 weeks after clinically uncomplicated myocardial infarction. Following an open-ended interview, a therapist rated 9 33 patients as moderately to severely depressed, of whom 3 33 (9%) were judged to require treatment for depression. Two self report scales identified only 2 of the 9 patients with moderate to severe depression and only 1 of the 3 patients requiring treatment. Following a standardized interview, a technician rated 4 of the next 31 patients as moderately to severely depressed, all of whom ( 4 31, 13%) were judged by the therapist to require treatment for depression. Self report identified only 2 of the 4 patients judged by the therapist to require treatment. A trained technician and a therapist detect about the same proportion of patients requiring treatment for depression after myocardial infarction. Both methods of interview are superior to self report scales for the detection of moderately severe depression requiring treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-133
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Chronic Diseases
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1981

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Optimal methods for identifying depression following hospitalization for myocardial infarction'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this