Optimal frequency, displacement, duration, and recovery patterns to maximize power output following acute whole-body vibration

Jessica B. Adams, David Edwards, Daniel Serviette, Abby M. Bedient, Emy Huntsman, Kevin A. Jacobs, Gianluca Del Rossi, Bernard A. Roos, Joseph F. Signorile

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64 Scopus citations

Abstract

Adams, JB, Edwards, D, Serviette, D, Bedient, AM, Huntsman, E, Jacobs, KA, Del Rossi, G, Roos, BA, and Signorile, JF. Optimal frequency, displacement, duration, and recovery patterns to maximize power output following acute whole-body vibration. J Strength Cond Res 23(1): 237-245, 2009-Power is an important component of general health, fitness, and athletic performance. Traditional overload techniques require considerable time, intensity, and volume of training. Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a potentially less time-consuming method for increasing power performance than traditional training. However, the exact protocols that can maximize power output have not yet been identified. Eleven healthy men, aged 32.3 ± 4.1 years, and 9 healthy women, aged 29.1 ± 3.5 years, performed countermovement jumps (CMJs) of maximal volition to assess peak power pre and post (immediately and at 1, 5, and 10 minutes) randomized WBV stimuli set at different frequency (30, 35, 40, and 50 Hz), displacement (2-4 vs. 4-6 mm), and duration (30, 45, and 60 seconds) combinations. Repeated-measures analysis of variance on peak power normalized to initial power (nPP) revealed no significant effects attributable to duration of stimulus. However, high frequencies were more effective when combined with high displacements, and low frequencies were more effective in conjunction with low displacements (p < 0.05). Additionally, the greatest improvements in nPP occurred at 1 minute posttreatment, with significant improvements lasting through 5 minutes posttreatment (p < 0.05). Optimal acute effects can be attained using as little as 30 seconds of WBV, and they are highest from 1 to 5 minutes posttreatment. Additionally, high frequencies were most effective when applied in conjunction with high displacements, whereas low frequencies were most effective when applied in conjunction with low displacements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-245
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of strength and conditioning research
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

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Keywords

  • Countermovement jumpimmediate effects
  • Protocols
  • WBV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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