Oophorectomy vs ovarian conservation with hysterectomy: Cardiovascular disease, hip fracture, and cancer in the women's health initiative observational study

Vanessa L. Jacoby, Deborah Grady, Jean Wactawski-Wende, Joann E. Manson, Matthew A. Allison, Miriam Kuppermann, Gloria E. Sarto, John Robbins, Lawrence Phillips, Lisa W. Martin, Mary Jo O'Sullivan, Rebecca Jackson, Rebecca J. Rodabough, Marcia L. Stefanick

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Abstract

Background: Elective bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) is routinely performed with hysterectomy for benign conditions despite conflicting data on longterm outcomes. Methods: This is a prospective cohort of 25 448 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 years enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study who had a history of hysterectomy and BSO (n=14 254 [56.0%]) or hysterectomy with ovarian conservation (n=11 194 [44.0%]) and no family history of ovarian cancer. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to examine the effect of BSO on incident cardiovascular disease, hip fracture, cancer, and death. Results: Current or past use of estrogen and/or progestin was common irrespective of BSO status (78.6% of cohort). In multivariable analyses, BSO was not associated with an increased risk of fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease (hazard ratio, 1.00 [95% confidence interval, 0.85- 1.18]), coronary artery bypass graft/percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (0.95 [0.82-1.10]), stroke (1.04 [0.87-1.24]), total cardiovascular disease (0.99 [0.91-1.09]), hip fracture (0.83 [0.63-1.10]), or death (0.98 [0.87-1.10]). Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy decreased incident ovarian cancer (0.02% in the BSO group; 0.33% in the ovarian conservation group; number needed to treat, 323) during a mean (SD) follow-up of 7.6 (1.6) years, but there were no significant associations for breast, colorectal, or lung cancer. Conclusions: In this large prospective cohort study, BSO decreased the risk of ovarian cancer compared with hysterectomy and ovarian conservation, but incident ovarian cancer was rare in both groups. Our findings suggest that BSOmaynot have an adverse effect on cardiovascular health, hip fracture, cancer, or total mortality compared with hysterectomy and ovarian conservation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)760-768
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume171
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 25 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Hip Fractures
Ovariectomy
Women's Health
Hysterectomy
Observational Studies
Cardiovascular Diseases
Ovarian Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Numbers Needed To Treat
Coronary Balloon Angioplasty
Progestins
Proportional Hazards Models
Coronary Artery Bypass
Coronary Disease
Colorectal Neoplasms
Lung Neoplasms
Estrogens
Cohort Studies
Stroke
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Oophorectomy vs ovarian conservation with hysterectomy : Cardiovascular disease, hip fracture, and cancer in the women's health initiative observational study. / Jacoby, Vanessa L.; Grady, Deborah; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Manson, Joann E.; Allison, Matthew A.; Kuppermann, Miriam; Sarto, Gloria E.; Robbins, John; Phillips, Lawrence; Martin, Lisa W.; Jo O'Sullivan, Mary; Jackson, Rebecca; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Stefanick, Marcia L.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 171, No. 8, 25.04.2011, p. 760-768.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jacoby, VL, Grady, D, Wactawski-Wende, J, Manson, JE, Allison, MA, Kuppermann, M, Sarto, GE, Robbins, J, Phillips, L, Martin, LW, Jo O'Sullivan, M, Jackson, R, Rodabough, RJ & Stefanick, ML 2011, 'Oophorectomy vs ovarian conservation with hysterectomy: Cardiovascular disease, hip fracture, and cancer in the women's health initiative observational study', Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 171, no. 8, pp. 760-768. https://doi.org/10.1001/archinternmed.2011.121
Jacoby, Vanessa L. ; Grady, Deborah ; Wactawski-Wende, Jean ; Manson, Joann E. ; Allison, Matthew A. ; Kuppermann, Miriam ; Sarto, Gloria E. ; Robbins, John ; Phillips, Lawrence ; Martin, Lisa W. ; Jo O'Sullivan, Mary ; Jackson, Rebecca ; Rodabough, Rebecca J. ; Stefanick, Marcia L. / Oophorectomy vs ovarian conservation with hysterectomy : Cardiovascular disease, hip fracture, and cancer in the women's health initiative observational study. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 171, No. 8. pp. 760-768.
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abstract = "Background: Elective bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) is routinely performed with hysterectomy for benign conditions despite conflicting data on longterm outcomes. Methods: This is a prospective cohort of 25 448 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 years enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study who had a history of hysterectomy and BSO (n=14 254 [56.0{\%}]) or hysterectomy with ovarian conservation (n=11 194 [44.0{\%}]) and no family history of ovarian cancer. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to examine the effect of BSO on incident cardiovascular disease, hip fracture, cancer, and death. Results: Current or past use of estrogen and/or progestin was common irrespective of BSO status (78.6{\%} of cohort). In multivariable analyses, BSO was not associated with an increased risk of fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease (hazard ratio, 1.00 [95{\%} confidence interval, 0.85- 1.18]), coronary artery bypass graft/percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (0.95 [0.82-1.10]), stroke (1.04 [0.87-1.24]), total cardiovascular disease (0.99 [0.91-1.09]), hip fracture (0.83 [0.63-1.10]), or death (0.98 [0.87-1.10]). Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy decreased incident ovarian cancer (0.02{\%} in the BSO group; 0.33{\%} in the ovarian conservation group; number needed to treat, 323) during a mean (SD) follow-up of 7.6 (1.6) years, but there were no significant associations for breast, colorectal, or lung cancer. Conclusions: In this large prospective cohort study, BSO decreased the risk of ovarian cancer compared with hysterectomy and ovarian conservation, but incident ovarian cancer was rare in both groups. Our findings suggest that BSOmaynot have an adverse effect on cardiovascular health, hip fracture, cancer, or total mortality compared with hysterectomy and ovarian conservation.",
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T2 - Cardiovascular disease, hip fracture, and cancer in the women's health initiative observational study

AU - Jacoby, Vanessa L.

AU - Grady, Deborah

AU - Wactawski-Wende, Jean

AU - Manson, Joann E.

AU - Allison, Matthew A.

AU - Kuppermann, Miriam

AU - Sarto, Gloria E.

AU - Robbins, John

AU - Phillips, Lawrence

AU - Martin, Lisa W.

AU - Jo O'Sullivan, Mary

AU - Jackson, Rebecca

AU - Rodabough, Rebecca J.

AU - Stefanick, Marcia L.

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N2 - Background: Elective bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) is routinely performed with hysterectomy for benign conditions despite conflicting data on longterm outcomes. Methods: This is a prospective cohort of 25 448 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 years enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study who had a history of hysterectomy and BSO (n=14 254 [56.0%]) or hysterectomy with ovarian conservation (n=11 194 [44.0%]) and no family history of ovarian cancer. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to examine the effect of BSO on incident cardiovascular disease, hip fracture, cancer, and death. Results: Current or past use of estrogen and/or progestin was common irrespective of BSO status (78.6% of cohort). In multivariable analyses, BSO was not associated with an increased risk of fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease (hazard ratio, 1.00 [95% confidence interval, 0.85- 1.18]), coronary artery bypass graft/percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (0.95 [0.82-1.10]), stroke (1.04 [0.87-1.24]), total cardiovascular disease (0.99 [0.91-1.09]), hip fracture (0.83 [0.63-1.10]), or death (0.98 [0.87-1.10]). Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy decreased incident ovarian cancer (0.02% in the BSO group; 0.33% in the ovarian conservation group; number needed to treat, 323) during a mean (SD) follow-up of 7.6 (1.6) years, but there were no significant associations for breast, colorectal, or lung cancer. Conclusions: In this large prospective cohort study, BSO decreased the risk of ovarian cancer compared with hysterectomy and ovarian conservation, but incident ovarian cancer was rare in both groups. Our findings suggest that BSOmaynot have an adverse effect on cardiovascular health, hip fracture, cancer, or total mortality compared with hysterectomy and ovarian conservation.

AB - Background: Elective bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) is routinely performed with hysterectomy for benign conditions despite conflicting data on longterm outcomes. Methods: This is a prospective cohort of 25 448 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 years enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study who had a history of hysterectomy and BSO (n=14 254 [56.0%]) or hysterectomy with ovarian conservation (n=11 194 [44.0%]) and no family history of ovarian cancer. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to examine the effect of BSO on incident cardiovascular disease, hip fracture, cancer, and death. Results: Current or past use of estrogen and/or progestin was common irrespective of BSO status (78.6% of cohort). In multivariable analyses, BSO was not associated with an increased risk of fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease (hazard ratio, 1.00 [95% confidence interval, 0.85- 1.18]), coronary artery bypass graft/percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (0.95 [0.82-1.10]), stroke (1.04 [0.87-1.24]), total cardiovascular disease (0.99 [0.91-1.09]), hip fracture (0.83 [0.63-1.10]), or death (0.98 [0.87-1.10]). Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy decreased incident ovarian cancer (0.02% in the BSO group; 0.33% in the ovarian conservation group; number needed to treat, 323) during a mean (SD) follow-up of 7.6 (1.6) years, but there were no significant associations for breast, colorectal, or lung cancer. Conclusions: In this large prospective cohort study, BSO decreased the risk of ovarian cancer compared with hysterectomy and ovarian conservation, but incident ovarian cancer was rare in both groups. Our findings suggest that BSOmaynot have an adverse effect on cardiovascular health, hip fracture, cancer, or total mortality compared with hysterectomy and ovarian conservation.

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