On the characteristic height scales of the hurricane boundary layer

Jun A. Zhang, Robert F. Rogers, David S Nolan, Frank D. Marks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

131 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, data from 794 GPS dropsondes deployed by research aircraft in 13 hurricanes are analyzed to study the characteristic height scales of the hurricane boundary layer. The height scales are defined in a variety of ways: the height of the maximum total wind speed, the inflow layer depth, and the mixed layer depth. The height of the maximum wind speed and the inflow layer depth are referred to as the dynamical boundary layer heights, while the mixed layer depth is referred to as the thermodynamical boundary layer height. The data analyses show that there is a clear separation of the thermodynamical and dynamical boundary layer heights. Consistent with previous studies on the boundary layer structure in individual storms, the dynamical boundary layer height is found to decrease with decreasing radius to the storm center. The thermodynamic boundary layer height, which is much shallower than the dynamical boundary layer height, is also found to decrease with decreasing radius to the storm center. The results also suggest that using the traditional critical Richardson number method to determine the boundary layer height may not accurately reproduce the height scale of the hurricane boundary layer. These different height scales reveal the complexity of the hurricane boundary layer structure that should be captured in hurricane model simulations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2523-2535
Number of pages13
JournalMonthly Weather Review
Volume139
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

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hurricane
boundary layer
mixed layer
inflow
wind velocity
Richardson number
aircraft
GPS
thermodynamics

Keywords

  • Aircraft observations
  • Boundary layer
  • Dropsondes
  • Hurricanes
  • Mixed layer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

On the characteristic height scales of the hurricane boundary layer. / Zhang, Jun A.; Rogers, Robert F.; Nolan, David S; Marks, Frank D.

In: Monthly Weather Review, Vol. 139, No. 8, 08.2011, p. 2523-2535.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, Jun A. ; Rogers, Robert F. ; Nolan, David S ; Marks, Frank D. / On the characteristic height scales of the hurricane boundary layer. In: Monthly Weather Review. 2011 ; Vol. 139, No. 8. pp. 2523-2535.
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