Older adults' health information needs and the effect of the Internet

Jessica Hirth, Sara J Czaja, Joseph Sharit

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Internet-based health information may be particularly beneficial for older adults as this segment of the population is likely to need healthcare information and services and often experiences problems accessing needed services and care. In order to effectively design e-health tools for seniors it is important to understand their health information needs and factors that enhance or impede their ability to use the Internet. Another important issue is to determine if in fact health information needs are satisfied to a greater extent between Internet users and non-users. This study explored these issues using six focus groups comprised of 35 adults aged 50+ (M = 69.71 years) with varying levels of Internet-based health information-seeking experience. Results indicated that the adults who used the Internet were quite satisfied with finding information from this source; however non-users were also quite satisfied with the more traditional sources that they rely on for health information.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Pages15-19
Number of pages5
Volume1
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
Event51st Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2007 - Baltimore, MD, United States
Duration: Oct 1 2007Oct 5 2007

Other

Other51st Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2007
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore, MD
Period10/1/0710/5/07

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health information
Health
Internet
experience
ability
health
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Hirth, J., Czaja, S. J., & Sharit, J. (2007). Older adults' health information needs and the effect of the Internet. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (Vol. 1, pp. 15-19)

Older adults' health information needs and the effect of the Internet. / Hirth, Jessica; Czaja, Sara J; Sharit, Joseph.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Vol. 1 2007. p. 15-19.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hirth, J, Czaja, SJ & Sharit, J 2007, Older adults' health information needs and the effect of the Internet. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. vol. 1, pp. 15-19, 51st Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2007, Baltimore, MD, United States, 10/1/07.
Hirth J, Czaja SJ, Sharit J. Older adults' health information needs and the effect of the Internet. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Vol. 1. 2007. p. 15-19
Hirth, Jessica ; Czaja, Sara J ; Sharit, Joseph. / Older adults' health information needs and the effect of the Internet. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Vol. 1 2007. pp. 15-19
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