Oil Exposure Impairs in Situ Cardiac Function in Response to β-Adrenergic Stimulation in Cobia (Rachycentron canadum)

Georgina K. Cox, Dane A. Crossley, John Stieglitz, Rachael M. Heuer, Daniel D Benetti, Martin Grosell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aqueous crude oil spills expose fish to varying concentrations of dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which can have lethal and sublethal effects. The heart is particularly vulnerable in early life stages, as PAH toxicity causes developmental cardiac abnormalities and impaired cardiovascular function. However, cardiac responses of juvenile and adult fish to acute oil exposure remain poorly understood. We sought to assess cardiac function in a pelagic fish species, the cobia (Rachycentron canadum), following acute (24 h) exposure to two ecologically relevant levels of dissolved PAHs. Cardiac power output (CPO) was used to quantify cardiovascular performance using an in situ heart preparation. Cardiovascular performance was varied using multiple concentrations of the β-adrenoceptor agonist isoproterenol (ISO) and by varying afterload pressures. Oil exposure adversely affected CPO with control fish achieving maximum CPO's (4 mW g-1 Mv) greater than that of oil-exposed fish (1 mW g-1 Mv) at ISO concentrations of 1 × 10-6 M. However, the highest concentration of ISO (1 × 10-5 M) rescued cardiac function. This indicates an interactive effect between oil-exposure and β-adrenergic stimulation and suggests if animals achieve very large increases in β-adrenergic stimulation it could play a compensatory role that may mitigate some adverse effects of oil-exposure in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14390-14396
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume51
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 19 2017

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Adrenergic Agents
Fish
Oils
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons
Isoproterenol
oil
PAH
fish
sublethal effect
pelagic fish
Oil spills
Petroleum
abnormality
oil spill
Adrenergic Receptors
crude oil
Toxicity
Animals
exposure
in situ

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Oil Exposure Impairs in Situ Cardiac Function in Response to β-Adrenergic Stimulation in Cobia (Rachycentron canadum). / Cox, Georgina K.; Crossley, Dane A.; Stieglitz, John; Heuer, Rachael M.; Benetti, Daniel D; Grosell, Martin.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 51, No. 24, 19.12.2017, p. 14390-14396.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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