Oculomotor, vestibular, and reaction time tests in mild traumatic brain injury

Carey Balaban, Michael E Hoffer, Mikhaylo Szczupak, Hillary A Snapp, James Crawford, Sara Murphy, Kathryn Marshall, Constanza Pelusso, Sean Knowles, Alex Kiderman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Mild traumatic brain injury is a major public health issue and is a particular concern in sports. One of the most difficult issues with respect to mild traumatic brain injury involves the diagnosis of the disorder. Typically, diagnosis is made by a constellation of physical exam findings. However, in order to best manage mild traumatic brain injury, it is critically important to develop objective tests that substantiate the diagnosis. With objective tests the disorder can be better characterized, more accurately diagnosed, and studied more effectively. In addition, prevention and treatments can be applied where necessary. Methods: Two cohorts each of fifty subjects with mild traumatic brain injury and one hundred controls were evaluated with a battery of oculomotor, vestibular and reaction time related tests applied to a population of individuals with mild traumatic brain injury as compared to controls. Results: We demonstrated pattern differences between the two groups and showed how three of these tests yield an 89% sensitivity and 95% specificity for confirming a current diagnosis of mild traumatic brain injury. Interpretation: These results help better characterize the oculomotor, vestibular, and reaction time differences between those the mild traumatic brain injury and non-affected individuals. This characterization will allow for the development of more effective point of care neurologic diagnostic techniques and allow for more targeted treatment which may allow for quicker return to normal activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0162168
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

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Brain Concussion
Brain
brain
testing
Neurological Diagnostic Techniques
Point-of-Care Systems
Public health
Sports
sports
nervous system
diagnostic techniques
public health
Public Health
Sensitivity and Specificity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Oculomotor, vestibular, and reaction time tests in mild traumatic brain injury. / Balaban, Carey; Hoffer, Michael E; Szczupak, Mikhaylo; Snapp, Hillary A; Crawford, James; Murphy, Sara; Marshall, Kathryn; Pelusso, Constanza; Knowles, Sean; Kiderman, Alex.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 9, e0162168, 01.09.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Balaban, C, Hoffer, ME, Szczupak, M, Snapp, HA, Crawford, J, Murphy, S, Marshall, K, Pelusso, C, Knowles, S & Kiderman, A 2016, 'Oculomotor, vestibular, and reaction time tests in mild traumatic brain injury', PLoS One, vol. 11, no. 9, e0162168. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0162168
Balaban, Carey ; Hoffer, Michael E ; Szczupak, Mikhaylo ; Snapp, Hillary A ; Crawford, James ; Murphy, Sara ; Marshall, Kathryn ; Pelusso, Constanza ; Knowles, Sean ; Kiderman, Alex. / Oculomotor, vestibular, and reaction time tests in mild traumatic brain injury. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 9.
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