Occult subcortical magnetic resonance findings in elderly depressives

C. M. Churchill, C. V. Priolo, Charles Nemeroff, K. Ranga, R. Krishnan, J. C S Breitner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hyperintense signal areas (HSA) on T2-weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may reflect subtle cerebro-vascular insufficiency and are common in elderly depressives. We hypothesized that these HSAs may indicate a vascular etiology for depression in late life, and that patients with late-onset major depression (MDD) would therefore more often show HSAs than comparably aged recurrent depressives. We reviewed the brain MRI flndings of a consecutive series of inpatients aged 50 or over who were treated for MDD during an 18-month period. Patients with Parkinson's or other brain diseases predisposing to depression were not considered. Twenty-seven(82%) of 33 palients with depression first apparent in late life and nine (64%) of 14 patients with earlier-onset, recurrent depression showed HSAs. This difference did not reach statistical significance. It was not attributable to the older mean age of the late-onset group. These rates are in accord with an 86% rate reported in a series of patients referred for ECT (Coffey et al., 1988). They are much higher than the 20-30% figure for comparably aged normals (Bradley, 1984; Kirkpatrick and Hayman, 1987). HSAs were common in this series of elderly depressed inpatients, regardless of age of onset of illness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-216
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume6
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Age of Onset
Blood Vessels
Inpatients
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain
Brain Diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Churchill, C. M., Priolo, C. V., Nemeroff, C., Ranga, K., Krishnan, R., & Breitner, J. C. S. (1991). Occult subcortical magnetic resonance findings in elderly depressives. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 6(4), 213-216.

Occult subcortical magnetic resonance findings in elderly depressives. / Churchill, C. M.; Priolo, C. V.; Nemeroff, Charles; Ranga, K.; Krishnan, R.; Breitner, J. C S.

In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 6, No. 4, 01.01.1991, p. 213-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Churchill, CM, Priolo, CV, Nemeroff, C, Ranga, K, Krishnan, R & Breitner, JCS 1991, 'Occult subcortical magnetic resonance findings in elderly depressives', International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 213-216.
Churchill CM, Priolo CV, Nemeroff C, Ranga K, Krishnan R, Breitner JCS. Occult subcortical magnetic resonance findings in elderly depressives. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 1991 Jan 1;6(4):213-216.
Churchill, C. M. ; Priolo, C. V. ; Nemeroff, Charles ; Ranga, K. ; Krishnan, R. ; Breitner, J. C S. / Occult subcortical magnetic resonance findings in elderly depressives. In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 1991 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 213-216.
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