Obesity and the skin: Skin physiology and skin manifestations of obesity

Gil Yosipovitch, Amy DeVore, Aerlyn Dawn

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

279 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity is widely recognized as an epidemic in the Western world; however, the impact of obesity on the skin has received minimal attention. The purpose of this article is to highlight the association between obesity and dermatologic conditions. We review the impact of obesity on the skin, including skin physiology, skin manifestations of obesity, and dermatologic diseases aggravated by obesity. Obesity is responsible for changes in skin barrier function, sebaceous glands and sebum production, sweat glands, lymphatics, collagen structure and function, wound healing, microcirculation and macrocirculation, and subcutaneous fat. Moreover, obesity is implicated in a wide spectrum of dermatologic diseases, including acanthosis nigricans, acrochordons, keratosis pilaris, hyperandrogenism and hirsutism, striae distensae, adiposis dolorosa, and fat redistribution, lymphedema, chronic venous insufficiency, plantar hyperkeratosis, cellulitis, skin infections, hidradenitis suppurativa, psoriasis, insulin resistance syndrome, and tophaceous gout. We review the clinical features, evidence for association with obesity, and management of these various dermatoses and highlight the profound impact of obesity in clinical dermatology. Learning objective: After completing this learning activity, participants should be aware of obesity-associated changes in skin physiology, skin manifestations of obesity, and dermatologic diseases aggravated by obesity, and be able to formulate a pathophysiology-based treatment strategy for obesity-associated dermatoses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)901-916
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume56
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Skin Physiological Phenomena
Skin Manifestations
Obesity
Skin
Skin Diseases
Adiposis Dolorosa
Striae Distensae
Hidradenitis Suppurativa
Learning
Sebum
Acanthosis Nigricans
Hyperandrogenism
Sebaceous Glands
Hirsutism
Sweat Glands
Venous Insufficiency
Western World
Cellulitis
Lymphedema
Gout

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Obesity and the skin : Skin physiology and skin manifestations of obesity. / Yosipovitch, Gil; DeVore, Amy; Dawn, Aerlyn.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Vol. 56, No. 6, 01.06.2007, p. 901-916.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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