Obesity and metabolic phenotypes (metabolically healthy and unhealthy variants) are significantly associated with prevalence of elevated C-reactive protein and hepatic steatosis in a large healthy Brazilian population

Sameer Shaharyar, Lara L. Roberson, Omar Jamal, Adnan Younus, Michael J. Blaha, Shozab S. Ali, Kenneth Zide, Arthur A. Agatston, Roger S. Blumenthal, Raquel D. Conceição, Raul D. Santos, Khurram Nasir

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20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Among the obese, the so-called metabolically healthy obese (MHO) phenotype is thought to confer a lower CVD risk as compared to obesity with typical associated metabolic changes. The present study aims to determine the relationship of different subtypes of obesity with inflammatory-cardiometabolic abnormalities. Methods. We evaluated 5,519 healthy, Brazilian subjects (43±10 years, 78% males), free of known cardiovascular disease. Those with <2 metabolic risk factors (MRF) were considered metabolically healthy, and those with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 and/or waist circumference meeting NCEP criteria for metabolic syndrome as overweight/obese (OW). High sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) was measured to assess underlying inflammation and hepatic steatosis (HS) was determined via abdominal ultrasound. Results. Overall, 40% of OW individuals were metabolically healthy, and 12% normal-weight had ≥2 MRF. The prevalence of elevated CRP (≥3 mg/dL) and HS in MHO versus normal weight metabolically healthy group was 22% versus 12%, and 40% versus 8% respectively (P<0.001). Both MHO individuals and metabolically unhealthy normal weight (MUNW) phenotypes were associated with elevated hsCRP and HS. Conclusion. Our study suggests that MHO and MUNW phenotypes may not be benign and physicians should strive to treat individuals in these subgroups to reverse these conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number178526
JournalJournal of Obesity
Volume2015
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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C-Reactive Protein
Obesity
Phenotype
Weights and Measures
Liver
Population
Waist Circumference
Healthy Volunteers
Cardiovascular Diseases
Inflammation
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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Obesity and metabolic phenotypes (metabolically healthy and unhealthy variants) are significantly associated with prevalence of elevated C-reactive protein and hepatic steatosis in a large healthy Brazilian population. / Shaharyar, Sameer; Roberson, Lara L.; Jamal, Omar; Younus, Adnan; Blaha, Michael J.; Ali, Shozab S.; Zide, Kenneth; Agatston, Arthur A.; Blumenthal, Roger S.; Conceição, Raquel D.; Santos, Raul D.; Nasir, Khurram.

In: Journal of Obesity, Vol. 2015, 178526, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shaharyar, Sameer ; Roberson, Lara L. ; Jamal, Omar ; Younus, Adnan ; Blaha, Michael J. ; Ali, Shozab S. ; Zide, Kenneth ; Agatston, Arthur A. ; Blumenthal, Roger S. ; Conceição, Raquel D. ; Santos, Raul D. ; Nasir, Khurram. / Obesity and metabolic phenotypes (metabolically healthy and unhealthy variants) are significantly associated with prevalence of elevated C-reactive protein and hepatic steatosis in a large healthy Brazilian population. In: Journal of Obesity. 2015 ; Vol. 2015.
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abstract = "Background. Among the obese, the so-called metabolically healthy obese (MHO) phenotype is thought to confer a lower CVD risk as compared to obesity with typical associated metabolic changes. The present study aims to determine the relationship of different subtypes of obesity with inflammatory-cardiometabolic abnormalities. Methods. We evaluated 5,519 healthy, Brazilian subjects (43±10 years, 78{\%} males), free of known cardiovascular disease. Those with <2 metabolic risk factors (MRF) were considered metabolically healthy, and those with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 and/or waist circumference meeting NCEP criteria for metabolic syndrome as overweight/obese (OW). High sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) was measured to assess underlying inflammation and hepatic steatosis (HS) was determined via abdominal ultrasound. Results. Overall, 40{\%} of OW individuals were metabolically healthy, and 12{\%} normal-weight had ≥2 MRF. The prevalence of elevated CRP (≥3 mg/dL) and HS in MHO versus normal weight metabolically healthy group was 22{\%} versus 12{\%}, and 40{\%} versus 8{\%} respectively (P<0.001). Both MHO individuals and metabolically unhealthy normal weight (MUNW) phenotypes were associated with elevated hsCRP and HS. Conclusion. Our study suggests that MHO and MUNW phenotypes may not be benign and physicians should strive to treat individuals in these subgroups to reverse these conditions.",
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AU - Jamal, Omar

AU - Younus, Adnan

AU - Blaha, Michael J.

AU - Ali, Shozab S.

AU - Zide, Kenneth

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