Noribogaine reduces nicotine self-administration in rats

Qing Chang, Taleen Hanania, Deborah C Mash, Emeline L. Maillet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Noribogaine, a polypharmacological drug with activities at opioid receptors, ionotropic nicotinic receptors, and serotonin reuptake transporters, has been investigated for treatment of substance abuse-related disorders. Smoking cessation has major benefits for both individuals and society, therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of noribogaine for use as a treatment for nicotine dependence. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to self-administer nicotine intravenous. After initial food pellet training, followed by 26 sessions of nicotine self-administration training, the rats were administered noribogaine (12.5, 25 or 50 mg/kg orally), noribogaine vehicle, varenicline or saline using a within-subject design with a Latin square test schedule. Noribogaine dose-dependently decreased nicotine self-administration by up to 64% of saline-treated rats' levels and was equi-effective to 1.7 mg/kg intraperitoneal varenicline. Noribogaine was less efficient at reducing food pellets self-administration than at nicotine self-administration, inhibiting the nondrug reinforcing effects of palatable pellets by 23% at the highest dose. These results suggest that noribogaine dose-dependently attenuates drug-taking behavior for nicotine, attenuates the reinforcing effects of nicotine and is comparable to varenicline power in that regard. The findings from the present study hold promise for a new therapy to aid smoking cessation.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages704-711
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Psychopharmacology
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 6 2015

Fingerprint

Self Administration
Nicotine
Smoking Cessation
Substance-Related Disorders
Food
Tobacco Use Disorder
Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Nicotinic Receptors
Opioid Receptors
noribogaine
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Sprague Dawley Rats
Appointments and Schedules
Therapeutics
Varenicline

Keywords

  • addiction
  • Food self-administration
  • α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist
  • α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Noribogaine reduces nicotine self-administration in rats. / Chang, Qing; Hanania, Taleen; Mash, Deborah C; Maillet, Emeline L.

In: Journal of Psychopharmacology, Vol. 29, No. 6, 06.06.2015, p. 704-711.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chang, Qing ; Hanania, Taleen ; Mash, Deborah C ; Maillet, Emeline L. / Noribogaine reduces nicotine self-administration in rats. In: Journal of Psychopharmacology. 2015 ; Vol. 29, No. 6. pp. 704-711.
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