Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the setting of acute myocardial infarction

George M. Farah, Jeffrey Goldberger

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia occurs commonly in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. By 24-48 hours after the onset of acute myocardial infarction, the incidence of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia declines. When analyzed as a dichotomous variable (present or absent), the presence of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the first 48-72 hours of acute myocardial infarction has been shown to have no prognostic significance. However, recent data suggest that the presence of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the first several hours during an acute myocardial infarction has no important prognostic significance, but that nonsustained ventricular tachycardia that occurs beyond the first several hours is associated with increased mortality. The pathogenesis of the increased mortality is unknown. Treatment should focus on the use of β blockers; specific antiarrhythmic drug therapy is not recommended. Polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is an uncommon arrhythmia in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. Its presence is thought to be associated with recurrent ischemia. Treatment should focus on aggressive attempts to reduce ischemia and intravenous amiodarone administration, if necessary.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)403-407
Number of pages5
JournalCardiovascular Reviews and Reports
Volume23
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ventricular Tachycardia
Myocardial Infarction
Ischemia
Amiodarone
Mortality
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents
Intravenous Administration
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Drug Therapy
Incidence
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. / Farah, George M.; Goldberger, Jeffrey.

In: Cardiovascular Reviews and Reports, Vol. 23, No. 7, 01.01.2002, p. 403-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{23d9a63761be4295a2770b35b8c3accd,
title = "Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the setting of acute myocardial infarction",
abstract = "Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia occurs commonly in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. By 24-48 hours after the onset of acute myocardial infarction, the incidence of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia declines. When analyzed as a dichotomous variable (present or absent), the presence of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the first 48-72 hours of acute myocardial infarction has been shown to have no prognostic significance. However, recent data suggest that the presence of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the first several hours during an acute myocardial infarction has no important prognostic significance, but that nonsustained ventricular tachycardia that occurs beyond the first several hours is associated with increased mortality. The pathogenesis of the increased mortality is unknown. Treatment should focus on the use of β blockers; specific antiarrhythmic drug therapy is not recommended. Polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is an uncommon arrhythmia in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. Its presence is thought to be associated with recurrent ischemia. Treatment should focus on aggressive attempts to reduce ischemia and intravenous amiodarone administration, if necessary.",
author = "Farah, {George M.} and Jeffrey Goldberger",
year = "2002",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "403--407",
journal = "Cardiovascular Reviews and Reports",
issn = "0197-3118",
publisher = "Le Jacq Communications, Inc.",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the setting of acute myocardial infarction

AU - Farah, George M.

AU - Goldberger, Jeffrey

PY - 2002/1/1

Y1 - 2002/1/1

N2 - Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia occurs commonly in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. By 24-48 hours after the onset of acute myocardial infarction, the incidence of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia declines. When analyzed as a dichotomous variable (present or absent), the presence of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the first 48-72 hours of acute myocardial infarction has been shown to have no prognostic significance. However, recent data suggest that the presence of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the first several hours during an acute myocardial infarction has no important prognostic significance, but that nonsustained ventricular tachycardia that occurs beyond the first several hours is associated with increased mortality. The pathogenesis of the increased mortality is unknown. Treatment should focus on the use of β blockers; specific antiarrhythmic drug therapy is not recommended. Polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is an uncommon arrhythmia in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. Its presence is thought to be associated with recurrent ischemia. Treatment should focus on aggressive attempts to reduce ischemia and intravenous amiodarone administration, if necessary.

AB - Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia occurs commonly in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. By 24-48 hours after the onset of acute myocardial infarction, the incidence of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia declines. When analyzed as a dichotomous variable (present or absent), the presence of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the first 48-72 hours of acute myocardial infarction has been shown to have no prognostic significance. However, recent data suggest that the presence of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the first several hours during an acute myocardial infarction has no important prognostic significance, but that nonsustained ventricular tachycardia that occurs beyond the first several hours is associated with increased mortality. The pathogenesis of the increased mortality is unknown. Treatment should focus on the use of β blockers; specific antiarrhythmic drug therapy is not recommended. Polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is an uncommon arrhythmia in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. Its presence is thought to be associated with recurrent ischemia. Treatment should focus on aggressive attempts to reduce ischemia and intravenous amiodarone administration, if necessary.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036313779&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036313779&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:0036313779

VL - 23

SP - 403

EP - 407

JO - Cardiovascular Reviews and Reports

JF - Cardiovascular Reviews and Reports

SN - 0197-3118

IS - 7

ER -