Non-apoid flower-visiting fauna of Everglades National Park, Florida

John B. Pascarella, K. D. Waddington, P. R. Neal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The non-apoid flower-visiting fauna of Everglades National Park (ENP), Florida, was surveyed during 1995-1997 as part of a community pollinator survey. One hundred and thirty one sampling trips were made to four areas of Everglades National Park (Shark Valley, Chekika, Long Pine Key (LPK), and Flamingo). Species-month curves indicate that the sampling effort resulted in capture of most of the flower-visiting animal species in the park. A total of 143 insects and 1 bird species were recorded. Diptera were the most diverse group (55 spp.), followed by Lepidoptera (42 spp.) and non-apoid Hymenoptera (34 spp.). The majority of species were rare (56% of species were found on fewer than five trips). The highest diversity of species was found from January to May during the peak flowering period in some plant communities. The greatest total diversity was found in Long Pine Key and Shark Valley had the lowest diversity. Chekika and Flamingo were intermediate in diversity. Animals visited 178 plant species, ∼26% of the potentially animal pollinated Angiosperm diversity of the park. Twenty-five species of plants had only non-apoid flower visitors; the majority of these species had only visits by Lepidoptera. Potentially important pollinator species include members of the Syrphidae, Coleoptera, and Lepidoptera. However, many of the flower-visiting species may not be effective pollinators. This study will be useful for designing sampling protocols for including invertebrates in assessments of ecological restoration underway in the Everglades ecosystem and for more detailed studies of the importance of non-apoid flower-visitors as effective pollinators.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)551-566
Number of pages16
JournalBiodiversity and Conservation
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Fingerprint

flower visiting
pollinating insects
national parks
national park
fauna
flowers
pollinator
Phoenicopteridae
Lepidoptera
sharks
valleys
Pinus
shark
animals
Syrphidae
flower
sampling
ecological restoration
valley
plant communities

Keywords

  • Biodiversity
  • Everglades National Park
  • Florida
  • Pollinators
  • Syrphidae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

Non-apoid flower-visiting fauna of Everglades National Park, Florida. / Pascarella, John B.; Waddington, K. D.; Neal, P. R.

In: Biodiversity and Conservation, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.01.2001, p. 551-566.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pascarella, John B. ; Waddington, K. D. ; Neal, P. R. / Non-apoid flower-visiting fauna of Everglades National Park, Florida. In: Biodiversity and Conservation. 2001 ; Vol. 10, No. 4. pp. 551-566.
@article{d554979471cd499da34be3d8f3407815,
title = "Non-apoid flower-visiting fauna of Everglades National Park, Florida",
abstract = "The non-apoid flower-visiting fauna of Everglades National Park (ENP), Florida, was surveyed during 1995-1997 as part of a community pollinator survey. One hundred and thirty one sampling trips were made to four areas of Everglades National Park (Shark Valley, Chekika, Long Pine Key (LPK), and Flamingo). Species-month curves indicate that the sampling effort resulted in capture of most of the flower-visiting animal species in the park. A total of 143 insects and 1 bird species were recorded. Diptera were the most diverse group (55 spp.), followed by Lepidoptera (42 spp.) and non-apoid Hymenoptera (34 spp.). The majority of species were rare (56{\%} of species were found on fewer than five trips). The highest diversity of species was found from January to May during the peak flowering period in some plant communities. The greatest total diversity was found in Long Pine Key and Shark Valley had the lowest diversity. Chekika and Flamingo were intermediate in diversity. Animals visited 178 plant species, ∼26{\%} of the potentially animal pollinated Angiosperm diversity of the park. Twenty-five species of plants had only non-apoid flower visitors; the majority of these species had only visits by Lepidoptera. Potentially important pollinator species include members of the Syrphidae, Coleoptera, and Lepidoptera. However, many of the flower-visiting species may not be effective pollinators. This study will be useful for designing sampling protocols for including invertebrates in assessments of ecological restoration underway in the Everglades ecosystem and for more detailed studies of the importance of non-apoid flower-visitors as effective pollinators.",
keywords = "Biodiversity, Everglades National Park, Florida, Pollinators, Syrphidae",
author = "Pascarella, {John B.} and Waddington, {K. D.} and Neal, {P. R.}",
year = "2001",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1023/A:1016688627518",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "551--566",
journal = "Biodiversity and Conservation",
issn = "0960-3115",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Non-apoid flower-visiting fauna of Everglades National Park, Florida

AU - Pascarella, John B.

AU - Waddington, K. D.

AU - Neal, P. R.

PY - 2001/1/1

Y1 - 2001/1/1

N2 - The non-apoid flower-visiting fauna of Everglades National Park (ENP), Florida, was surveyed during 1995-1997 as part of a community pollinator survey. One hundred and thirty one sampling trips were made to four areas of Everglades National Park (Shark Valley, Chekika, Long Pine Key (LPK), and Flamingo). Species-month curves indicate that the sampling effort resulted in capture of most of the flower-visiting animal species in the park. A total of 143 insects and 1 bird species were recorded. Diptera were the most diverse group (55 spp.), followed by Lepidoptera (42 spp.) and non-apoid Hymenoptera (34 spp.). The majority of species were rare (56% of species were found on fewer than five trips). The highest diversity of species was found from January to May during the peak flowering period in some plant communities. The greatest total diversity was found in Long Pine Key and Shark Valley had the lowest diversity. Chekika and Flamingo were intermediate in diversity. Animals visited 178 plant species, ∼26% of the potentially animal pollinated Angiosperm diversity of the park. Twenty-five species of plants had only non-apoid flower visitors; the majority of these species had only visits by Lepidoptera. Potentially important pollinator species include members of the Syrphidae, Coleoptera, and Lepidoptera. However, many of the flower-visiting species may not be effective pollinators. This study will be useful for designing sampling protocols for including invertebrates in assessments of ecological restoration underway in the Everglades ecosystem and for more detailed studies of the importance of non-apoid flower-visitors as effective pollinators.

AB - The non-apoid flower-visiting fauna of Everglades National Park (ENP), Florida, was surveyed during 1995-1997 as part of a community pollinator survey. One hundred and thirty one sampling trips were made to four areas of Everglades National Park (Shark Valley, Chekika, Long Pine Key (LPK), and Flamingo). Species-month curves indicate that the sampling effort resulted in capture of most of the flower-visiting animal species in the park. A total of 143 insects and 1 bird species were recorded. Diptera were the most diverse group (55 spp.), followed by Lepidoptera (42 spp.) and non-apoid Hymenoptera (34 spp.). The majority of species were rare (56% of species were found on fewer than five trips). The highest diversity of species was found from January to May during the peak flowering period in some plant communities. The greatest total diversity was found in Long Pine Key and Shark Valley had the lowest diversity. Chekika and Flamingo were intermediate in diversity. Animals visited 178 plant species, ∼26% of the potentially animal pollinated Angiosperm diversity of the park. Twenty-five species of plants had only non-apoid flower visitors; the majority of these species had only visits by Lepidoptera. Potentially important pollinator species include members of the Syrphidae, Coleoptera, and Lepidoptera. However, many of the flower-visiting species may not be effective pollinators. This study will be useful for designing sampling protocols for including invertebrates in assessments of ecological restoration underway in the Everglades ecosystem and for more detailed studies of the importance of non-apoid flower-visitors as effective pollinators.

KW - Biodiversity

KW - Everglades National Park

KW - Florida

KW - Pollinators

KW - Syrphidae

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035025196&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035025196&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1023/A:1016688627518

DO - 10.1023/A:1016688627518

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0035025196

VL - 10

SP - 551

EP - 566

JO - Biodiversity and Conservation

JF - Biodiversity and Conservation

SN - 0960-3115

IS - 4

ER -