No gene is an island: The flip-flop phenomenon

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Abstract

An increasing number of publications are replicating a previously reported disease-marker association but with the risk allele reversed from the previous report. Do such "flip-flop" associations confirm or refute the previous association findings? We hypothesized that these associations may indeed be confirmations but that multilocus effects and variation in interlocus correlations contribute to this flip-flop phenomenon. We used theoretical modeling to demonstrate that flip-flop associations can occur when the investigated variant is correlated, through interactive effects or linkage dis-equilibrium, with a causal variant at another locus, and we show how these findings could explain previous reports of flip-flop associations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)531-538
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Human Genetics
Volume80
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

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  • Genetics

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No gene is an island : The flip-flop phenomenon. / Lin, Ping I.; Vance, Jeffery M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Martin, Eden R.

In: American Journal of Human Genetics, Vol. 80, No. 3, 01.03.2007, p. 531-538.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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