No gene is an island: The flip-flop phenomenon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

384 Scopus citations

Abstract

An increasing number of publications are replicating a previously reported disease-marker association but with the risk allele reversed from the previous report. Do such "flip-flop" associations confirm or refute the previous association findings? We hypothesized that these associations may indeed be confirmations but that multilocus effects and variation in interlocus correlations contribute to this flip-flop phenomenon. We used theoretical modeling to demonstrate that flip-flop associations can occur when the investigated variant is correlated, through interactive effects or linkage dis-equilibrium, with a causal variant at another locus, and we show how these findings could explain previous reports of flip-flop associations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)531-538
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of human genetics
Volume80
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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