No Differences in Cervical Cancer Stage at Diagnosis for Blacks and Whites in the Mountain West

Sanae El Ibrahimi, Paulo Pinheiro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study assesses cervical cancer disparities between Blacks and Whites in terms of stage at diagnosis in a Mountain West state. A total of 1,408 women diagnosed with cervical cancer between 1995 and 2010 were identified from the Nevada Central Cancer Registry. Logistic regression modeling examined the effect of race on stage at diagnosis in both Nevada and the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) population. After controlling for the main confounders, no significant differences in stage at diagnosis were observed between Black and White females in Nevada (aOR 0.91; 95 % CI 0.57–1.43). In contrast, Black women in SEER areas had a 21 % higher odds of being diagnosed at an advanced stage compared to Whites. Our findings suggest a favorable disparity balance for cervical cancer in Nevada where Blacks are largely recent arrivals in relation to the remaining US, where Blacks have long been established.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)632-637
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 30 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Blacks
  • Cervical cancer
  • Disparities
  • Stage at diagnosis
  • Whites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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