Nitric oxide and oxidative stress in cardiovascular aging.

Shubha V Y Raju, Lili A. Barouch, Joshua Hare

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The long-standing free radical theory of aging, which attributes cellular pathology to the relentless accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), remains attractive but controversial. Emerging insights into the molecular interactions between ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitric oxide suggest that, in biological systems, one effect of increased ROS is the disruption of protein S-nitrosylation, a ubiquitous posttranslational modification system. In this way, ROS may not only damage cells but also disrupt widespread signaling pathways. Here, we discuss this phenomenon in the context of the cardiovascular system and propose that ideas regarding oxidative stress and aging need to be reevaluated to take account of the balance between oxidative and nitrosative stress.

Original languageEnglish
JournalScience of aging knowledge environment [electronic resource] : SAGE KE
Volume2005
Issue number21
StatePublished - May 25 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Reactive Oxygen Species
Nitric Oxide
Oxidative Stress
Reactive Nitrogen Species
Protein S
Post Translational Protein Processing
Cardiovascular System
Free Radicals
Pathology

Cite this

Nitric oxide and oxidative stress in cardiovascular aging. / Raju, Shubha V Y; Barouch, Lili A.; Hare, Joshua.

In: Science of aging knowledge environment [electronic resource] : SAGE KE, Vol. 2005, No. 21, 25.05.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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