New directions in the development of antidepressants: The interface of neurobiology and psychiatry

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41 Scopus citations

Abstract

There have been considerable advances in neurobiology in recent years that are providing new directions for the development of novel classes of antidepressants. For example, the finding that corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is hypersecreted in depressed patients and mediates certain symptoms of depression has led to the development of specific antagonists of the CRF1 receptor. These are expected to prove highly effective for the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders. Another related avenue of research is based on evidence that cortisol is integral to the pathophysiology of major depression with psychotic features. One alternative for treating this subtype of affective disorder is, therefore, to block the action of glucocorticoids using a receptor antagonist such as mifepristone. These are just two of the many new directions that will likely lead to the development of antidepressants in the near future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S13-S16
JournalHuman Psychopharmacology
Volume17
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Keywords

  • Antidepressants
  • CRF receptors
  • Depression
  • Glucocorticoid receptors
  • Psychotic depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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