New common program requirements for the resident physician workforce and the omission of strategic napping: A missed opportunity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Napping has known benefits for fatigue mitigation and improved alertness. However the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) New Common Program Requirements recently removed the 16 h work limit for PGY1 residents and removed any suggestions of napping. Methods: We utilized a cross-sectional study design to administer a 44-item questionnaire in June 2016 to 858 residents and fellows at one large urban academic medical center. We assessed: 1) resident physician sentiment of work environment supportiveness for napping at work; and 2) agreement with 2011 ACGME guidelines on workweek hour limitations and strategic napping recommendations. Results: While 89% of residents reported access to an on-call room at work, only 20% felt their work environment supported a culture of napping while at work. Over 76% expressed agreement with the 2011 ACGME work-hour restrictions. Conclusions: Strategies to support napping and well-being within the resident physician workforce and organizational setting are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)762-765
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume60
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

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Physicians
Graduate Medical Education
Accreditation
Fatigue
Cross-Sectional Studies
Guidelines

Keywords

  • Injury prevention
  • napping
  • resident physician workforce
  • work environment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "New common program requirements for the resident physician workforce and the omission of strategic napping: A missed opportunity",
abstract = "Objectives: Napping has known benefits for fatigue mitigation and improved alertness. However the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) New Common Program Requirements recently removed the 16 h work limit for PGY1 residents and removed any suggestions of napping. Methods: We utilized a cross-sectional study design to administer a 44-item questionnaire in June 2016 to 858 residents and fellows at one large urban academic medical center. We assessed: 1) resident physician sentiment of work environment supportiveness for napping at work; and 2) agreement with 2011 ACGME guidelines on workweek hour limitations and strategic napping recommendations. Results: While 89{\%} of residents reported access to an on-call room at work, only 20{\%} felt their work environment supported a culture of napping while at work. Over 76{\%} expressed agreement with the 2011 ACGME work-hour restrictions. Conclusions: Strategies to support napping and well-being within the resident physician workforce and organizational setting are warranted.",
keywords = "Injury prevention, napping, resident physician workforce, work environment",
author = "Shnayder, {Michelle M.} and {St. Onge}, Joan and Caban-Martinez, {Alberto J}",
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