New aspects in the diagnosis and therapy of mycobacterial keratitis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Mycobacterial keratitis is a rare event [1]. In general, infection rates constitute less than 2% of reported infectious microbial keratitis cases [2, 3]. Rates may vary by geographical locations and have been as high as 8% in some reported series from Asia (Reddy, Lalthia, Huang). Trends in recovery of mycobacteria from keratitis increased in number and diversity of pathogens in the last decade (Fig. 1.1 and Table 1.1). Disease recognition, confirmation and management, however, remain challenging. Clinical diagnosis is problematic due to delay in presentation, low index of suspicion, mimicry of fungal or viral keratitis, and prior antibiotic and/or corticosteroid therapy. Traditional risk factors have included trauma with metal objects, soil and/or vegetable matter or following surgical interventions such as radial keratotomy, photorefractive keratectomy, cataract surgery, or contact lens wear (Fig. 1.2). Current and emerging risk factors are mainly health care related and include surgical procedures (LASIK, LASEK, DSEK), smart plugs, and other biomaterials (Fig. 1.3). In several patients, no identifiable risk factor has been documented [4-7].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCorneal Disease: Recent Developments in Diagnosis and Therapy
PublisherSpringer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Pages1-18
Number of pages18
Volume9783642287473
ISBN (Print)9783642287473, 3642287468, 9783642287466
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2013

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Keratitis
Laser-Assisted Subepithelial Keratectomy
Radial Keratotomy
Photorefractive Keratectomy
Laser In Situ Keratomileusis
Contact Lenses
Biocompatible Materials
Therapeutics
Mycobacterium
Vegetables
Cataract
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Soil
Metals
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Delivery of Health Care
Wounds and Injuries
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Miller, D., Girgis, D., Karp, C., & Alfonso, E. C. (2013). New aspects in the diagnosis and therapy of mycobacterial keratitis. In Corneal Disease: Recent Developments in Diagnosis and Therapy (Vol. 9783642287473, pp. 1-18). Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-28747-3_1

New aspects in the diagnosis and therapy of mycobacterial keratitis. / Miller, Darlene; Girgis, Dalia; Karp, Carol; Alfonso, Eduardo C.

Corneal Disease: Recent Developments in Diagnosis and Therapy. Vol. 9783642287473 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 2013. p. 1-18.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Miller, D, Girgis, D, Karp, C & Alfonso, EC 2013, New aspects in the diagnosis and therapy of mycobacterial keratitis. in Corneal Disease: Recent Developments in Diagnosis and Therapy. vol. 9783642287473, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 1-18. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-28747-3_1
Miller D, Girgis D, Karp C, Alfonso EC. New aspects in the diagnosis and therapy of mycobacterial keratitis. In Corneal Disease: Recent Developments in Diagnosis and Therapy. Vol. 9783642287473. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. 2013. p. 1-18 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-28747-3_1
Miller, Darlene ; Girgis, Dalia ; Karp, Carol ; Alfonso, Eduardo C. / New aspects in the diagnosis and therapy of mycobacterial keratitis. Corneal Disease: Recent Developments in Diagnosis and Therapy. Vol. 9783642287473 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 2013. pp. 1-18
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