New Applications of Self-Control Theory to Computer-Focused Cyber Deviance and Victimization: A Comparison of Cognitive and Behavioral Measures of Self-Control and Test of Peer Cyber Deviance and Gender as Moderators

Eric R. Louderback, Olena Antonaccio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study tests the effects of behavioral and cognitive measures of self-control on computer-focused cyber deviance and cyber victimization with survey data from 1,036 adult employees. We examine moderating effects of cyber deviant peers and gender in the relationship between self-control, and cyber deviance and victimization. Cognitive and behavioral measures of self-control are negativity associated with cyber deviance, whereas only behavioral self-control predicted reduced cyber victimization. Moderation analyses show that cyber deviant peer associations condition the relationship between self-control, and both cyber deviance and victimization. Gender moderation models reveal no consistent significant effects. The results have implications for the understanding of cognitive predictors of computer-focused cybercrime and victimization, as well as institutional cybercrime prevention policies. Our findings can inform the future integration of self-control and social learning theories in cyberspace.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)366-398
Number of pages33
JournalCrime and Delinquency
Volume67
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • criminological theory
  • cybercrime
  • deviant peers
  • hacking victimization
  • self-control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

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