Neutrophil activation: An alternative to prostaglandin inhibition as the mechanism of action for NSAIDs

Roy D Altman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Experimental findings suggest that inhibition of neutrophil activation rather than suppression of prostaglandin formation may represent the principal mechanism of action of antiinflammatory drugs. This theory would account for the effectiveness of prostaglandin preserving agents, such as the nonacetylated salicylate salsalate, in the treatment of rheumatic disease. Results of the controlled clinical trials described in other papers contained in this supplement indicate that salsalate is equally effective as aspirin and the newer NSAID naproxen in relieving the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. The damage to the gastric mucosa associated with NSAID use is believed to be attributable to impairment of mucosal defense mechanisms resulting from the inhibition of gastroprotective prostaglandins. Confirmation of neutrophil activation as the mechanism of action of NSAIDs would explain the efficacy of salsalate in light of its lower incidence of gastrointestinal side effects in controlled clinical trials with aspirin and naproxen. Establishment of such a mechanism would also suggest that the other adverse effects related to prostaglandin inhibition, such as hypersensitivity reactions, platelet dysfunction, and a reduction in renal function, are not necessary correlates of effective antiinflammatory therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalSeminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism
Volume19
Issue number4 SUPPL. 2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Neutrophil Activation
Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Prostaglandins
Naproxen
Controlled Clinical Trials
Aspirin
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Salicylates
Gastric Mucosa
Rheumatic Diseases
Signs and Symptoms
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Hypersensitivity
Blood Platelets
Kidney
Incidence
Pharmaceutical Preparations
salicylsalicylic acid
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Neutrophil activation : An alternative to prostaglandin inhibition as the mechanism of action for NSAIDs. / Altman, Roy D.

In: Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 19, No. 4 SUPPL. 2, 1990, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{06ddad02ab89448fb52a4ceabc08cf74,
title = "Neutrophil activation: An alternative to prostaglandin inhibition as the mechanism of action for NSAIDs",
abstract = "Experimental findings suggest that inhibition of neutrophil activation rather than suppression of prostaglandin formation may represent the principal mechanism of action of antiinflammatory drugs. This theory would account for the effectiveness of prostaglandin preserving agents, such as the nonacetylated salicylate salsalate, in the treatment of rheumatic disease. Results of the controlled clinical trials described in other papers contained in this supplement indicate that salsalate is equally effective as aspirin and the newer NSAID naproxen in relieving the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. The damage to the gastric mucosa associated with NSAID use is believed to be attributable to impairment of mucosal defense mechanisms resulting from the inhibition of gastroprotective prostaglandins. Confirmation of neutrophil activation as the mechanism of action of NSAIDs would explain the efficacy of salsalate in light of its lower incidence of gastrointestinal side effects in controlled clinical trials with aspirin and naproxen. Establishment of such a mechanism would also suggest that the other adverse effects related to prostaglandin inhibition, such as hypersensitivity reactions, platelet dysfunction, and a reduction in renal function, are not necessary correlates of effective antiinflammatory therapy.",
author = "Altman, {Roy D}",
year = "1990",
doi = "10.1016/0049-0172(90)90077-S",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "1--5",
journal = "Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism",
issn = "0049-0172",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "4 SUPPL. 2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neutrophil activation

T2 - An alternative to prostaglandin inhibition as the mechanism of action for NSAIDs

AU - Altman, Roy D

PY - 1990

Y1 - 1990

N2 - Experimental findings suggest that inhibition of neutrophil activation rather than suppression of prostaglandin formation may represent the principal mechanism of action of antiinflammatory drugs. This theory would account for the effectiveness of prostaglandin preserving agents, such as the nonacetylated salicylate salsalate, in the treatment of rheumatic disease. Results of the controlled clinical trials described in other papers contained in this supplement indicate that salsalate is equally effective as aspirin and the newer NSAID naproxen in relieving the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. The damage to the gastric mucosa associated with NSAID use is believed to be attributable to impairment of mucosal defense mechanisms resulting from the inhibition of gastroprotective prostaglandins. Confirmation of neutrophil activation as the mechanism of action of NSAIDs would explain the efficacy of salsalate in light of its lower incidence of gastrointestinal side effects in controlled clinical trials with aspirin and naproxen. Establishment of such a mechanism would also suggest that the other adverse effects related to prostaglandin inhibition, such as hypersensitivity reactions, platelet dysfunction, and a reduction in renal function, are not necessary correlates of effective antiinflammatory therapy.

AB - Experimental findings suggest that inhibition of neutrophil activation rather than suppression of prostaglandin formation may represent the principal mechanism of action of antiinflammatory drugs. This theory would account for the effectiveness of prostaglandin preserving agents, such as the nonacetylated salicylate salsalate, in the treatment of rheumatic disease. Results of the controlled clinical trials described in other papers contained in this supplement indicate that salsalate is equally effective as aspirin and the newer NSAID naproxen in relieving the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. The damage to the gastric mucosa associated with NSAID use is believed to be attributable to impairment of mucosal defense mechanisms resulting from the inhibition of gastroprotective prostaglandins. Confirmation of neutrophil activation as the mechanism of action of NSAIDs would explain the efficacy of salsalate in light of its lower incidence of gastrointestinal side effects in controlled clinical trials with aspirin and naproxen. Establishment of such a mechanism would also suggest that the other adverse effects related to prostaglandin inhibition, such as hypersensitivity reactions, platelet dysfunction, and a reduction in renal function, are not necessary correlates of effective antiinflammatory therapy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025319927&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025319927&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0049-0172(90)90077-S

DO - 10.1016/0049-0172(90)90077-S

M3 - Article

C2 - 2181672

AN - SCOPUS:0025319927

VL - 19

SP - 1

EP - 5

JO - Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism

JF - Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism

SN - 0049-0172

IS - 4 SUPPL. 2

ER -