Neurologic aspects of traumatic brain injury

Rebecca F. Gottesman, Ricardo J Komotar, Argye E. Hillis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury is a common neurologic condition that can have a significant emotional and financial burden. Neurologic injury is classified on the basis of initial clinical status by the Glasgow Coma Scale, and also by the type and location of head injury. Complications in the management of these patients are reviewed, ranging from intracranial pressure management and stroke to post-traumatic epilepsy. In addition, predictive prognostic variables that can be used to predict outcome based on a patient's presentation at the time of a head trauma are discussed. Finally, interventions such as induced hypothermia that can be undertaken to try to optimize outcome, are discussed along with current data in support of or against such techniques.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)302-309
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Review of Psychiatry
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Craniocerebral Trauma
Nervous System
Post-Traumatic Epilepsy
Nervous System Trauma
Induced Hypothermia
Glasgow Coma Scale
Intracranial Pressure
Stroke
Traumatic Brain Injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Neurologic aspects of traumatic brain injury. / Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Komotar, Ricardo J; Hillis, Argye E.

In: International Review of Psychiatry, Vol. 15, No. 4, 01.11.2003, p. 302-309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gottesman, Rebecca F. ; Komotar, Ricardo J ; Hillis, Argye E. / Neurologic aspects of traumatic brain injury. In: International Review of Psychiatry. 2003 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 302-309.
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