Neurolinguistic programming training, trait anxiety, and locus of control.

Janet Konefal, R. C. Duncan, M. A. Reese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Training in the neurolinguistic programming techniques of shifting perceptual position, visual-kinesthetic dissociation, timelines, and change-history, all based on experiential cognitive processing of remembered events, leads to an increased awareness of behavioral contingencies and a more sensitive recognition of environmental cues which could serve to lower trait anxiety and increase the sense of internal control. This study reports on within-person and between-group changes in trait anxiety and locus of control as measured on the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Wallston, Wallston, and DeVallis' Multiple Health Locus of Control immediately following a 21-day residential training in neurolinguistic programming. Significant with-in-person decreases in trait-anxiety scores and increases in internal locus of control scores were observed as predicted. Chance and powerful other locus of control scores were unchanged. Significant differences were noted on trait anxiety and locus of control scores between European and U.S. participants, although change scores were similar for the two groups. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that this training may lower trait-anxiety scores and increase internal locus of control scores. A matched control group was not available, and follow-up was unfortunately not possible.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)819-832
Number of pages14
JournalPsychological Reports
Volume70
Issue number3 Pt 1
StatePublished - Jun 1 1992

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Neurolinguistic Programming
Internal-External Control
Anxiety
Dissociative Disorders
Cues
Research Design
History
Equipment and Supplies
Control Groups
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Konefal, J., Duncan, R. C., & Reese, M. A. (1992). Neurolinguistic programming training, trait anxiety, and locus of control. Psychological Reports, 70(3 Pt 1), 819-832.

Neurolinguistic programming training, trait anxiety, and locus of control. / Konefal, Janet; Duncan, R. C.; Reese, M. A.

In: Psychological Reports, Vol. 70, No. 3 Pt 1, 01.06.1992, p. 819-832.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Konefal, J, Duncan, RC & Reese, MA 1992, 'Neurolinguistic programming training, trait anxiety, and locus of control.', Psychological Reports, vol. 70, no. 3 Pt 1, pp. 819-832.
Konefal J, Duncan RC, Reese MA. Neurolinguistic programming training, trait anxiety, and locus of control. Psychological Reports. 1992 Jun 1;70(3 Pt 1):819-832.
Konefal, Janet ; Duncan, R. C. ; Reese, M. A. / Neurolinguistic programming training, trait anxiety, and locus of control. In: Psychological Reports. 1992 ; Vol. 70, No. 3 Pt 1. pp. 819-832.
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