Neuroleptic malignant syndrome: A complication of neuroleptics and cocaine abuse

MaCaulay J. Akpaffiong, Pedro Ruiz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One hundred and sixty psychiatric patients on Neuroleptics, with and without a history of substance abuse were daily monitored in order to establish the incidence of neuroleptic malignant syndrome in these two groups. Four (5.1%) of the cocaine abusers and none of the non-cocaine abusers developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome when treated with neuroleptics. Thus we argue that psychiatric patients with a history of cocaine abuse may be more at risk of developing neuroleptic malignant syndrome when treated with neuroleptics, possibly associated with the blockade of dopamine (D2-receptors) by neuroleptics and the activation of dopamine/5-HT receptors by cocaine-induced dopamine.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-309
Number of pages11
JournalPsychiatric Quarterly
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome
Cocaine-Related Disorders
Antipsychotic Agents
Cocaine
Psychiatry
Dopamine
Dopamine D2 Receptors
Serotonin Receptors
Substance-Related Disorders
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Neuroleptic malignant syndrome : A complication of neuroleptics and cocaine abuse. / Akpaffiong, MaCaulay J.; Ruiz, Pedro.

In: Psychiatric Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 4, 01.12.1991, p. 299-309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Akpaffiong, MaCaulay J. ; Ruiz, Pedro. / Neuroleptic malignant syndrome : A complication of neuroleptics and cocaine abuse. In: Psychiatric Quarterly. 1991 ; Vol. 62, No. 4. pp. 299-309.
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