Neuroimmunoendocrine circuitry of the 'brain-skin connection'

Ralf Paus, Theoharis C. Theoharides, Petra Clara Arck

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

212 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The skin offers an ideally suited, clinically relevant model for studying the crossroads between peripheral and systemic responses to stress. A 'brain-skin connection' with local neuroimmunoendocrine circuitry underlies the pathogenesis of allergic and inflammatory skin diseases, triggered or aggravated by stress. In stressed mice, corticotropin-releasing hormone, nerve growth factor, neurotensin, substance P and mast cells are recruited hierarchically to induce neurogenic skin inflammation, which inhibits hair growth. The hair follicle is both a target and a source for immunomodulatory stress mediators, and has an equivalent of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. Thus, the skin and its appendages enable the study of complex neuroimmunoendocrine responses that peripheral tissues launch upon stress exposure, as a basis for identifying new targets for therapeutic stress intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-39
Number of pages8
JournalTrends in Immunology
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Skin
Brain
Neurogenic Inflammation
Neurotensin
Hair Follicle
Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone
Nerve Growth Factor
Substance P
Skin Diseases
Mast Cells
Hair
Hypothalamus
Growth
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Neuroimmunoendocrine circuitry of the 'brain-skin connection'. / Paus, Ralf; Theoharides, Theoharis C.; Arck, Petra Clara.

In: Trends in Immunology, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.01.2006, p. 32-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Paus, Ralf ; Theoharides, Theoharis C. ; Arck, Petra Clara. / Neuroimmunoendocrine circuitry of the 'brain-skin connection'. In: Trends in Immunology. 2006 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 32-39.
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