Neuroimaging abnormalities in adults with sickle cell anemia

Associations with cognition

R. Scott Mackin, Philip Insel, Diana Truran, Elliot P. Vichinsky, Lynne D. Neumayr, F. Daniel Armstrong, Jeffrey I. Gold, Karen Kesler, Joseph Brewer, Michael W. Weiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study was conducted to determine the relationship of frontal lobe cortical thickness and basal ganglia volumes to measures of cognition in adults with sickle cell anemia (SCA). Methods: Participants included 120 adults with SCA with no history of neurologic dysfunction and 33 healthy controls (HCs). Participants were enrolled at 12 medical center sites, and raters were blinded to diagnostic group. We hypothesized that individuals with SCA would exhibit reductions in frontal lobe cortex thickness and reduced basal ganglia and thalamus volumes compared with HCs and that these structural brain abnormalities would be associated with measures of cognitive functioning (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, 3rd edition). Results: After adjusting for age, sex, education level, and intracranial volume, participants with SCA exhibited thinner frontal lobe cortex (t = -2.99, p = 0.003) and reduced basal ganglia and thalamus volumes compared with HCs (t=23.95, p < 0.001). Reduced volume of the basal ganglia and thalamus was significantly associated with lower Performance IQ (model estimate = 3.75, p = 0.004) as well as lower Perceptual Organization (model estimate = 1.44, p = 0.007) and Working Memory scores (model estimate = 1.37, p = 0.015). Frontal lobe cortex thickness was not significantly associated with any cognitive measures. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that basal ganglia and thalamus abnormalitiesmay represent a particularly salient contributor to cognitive dysfunction in adults with SCA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)835-841
Number of pages7
JournalNeurology
Volume82
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 11 2014

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Sickle Cell Anemia
Frontal Lobe
Neuroimaging
Cognition
Basal Ganglia
Thalamus
Sex Education
Neurologic Manifestations
Sickles
Anemia
Cells
Intelligence
Short-Term Memory
Cortex
Brain
Thickness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Mackin, R. S., Insel, P., Truran, D., Vichinsky, E. P., Neumayr, L. D., Daniel Armstrong, F., ... Weiner, M. W. (2014). Neuroimaging abnormalities in adults with sickle cell anemia: Associations with cognition. Neurology, 82(10), 835-841. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL0000000000000188

Neuroimaging abnormalities in adults with sickle cell anemia : Associations with cognition. / Mackin, R. Scott; Insel, Philip; Truran, Diana; Vichinsky, Elliot P.; Neumayr, Lynne D.; Daniel Armstrong, F.; Gold, Jeffrey I.; Kesler, Karen; Brewer, Joseph; Weiner, Michael W.

In: Neurology, Vol. 82, No. 10, 11.03.2014, p. 835-841.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mackin, RS, Insel, P, Truran, D, Vichinsky, EP, Neumayr, LD, Daniel Armstrong, F, Gold, JI, Kesler, K, Brewer, J & Weiner, MW 2014, 'Neuroimaging abnormalities in adults with sickle cell anemia: Associations with cognition', Neurology, vol. 82, no. 10, pp. 835-841. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL0000000000000188
Mackin, R. Scott ; Insel, Philip ; Truran, Diana ; Vichinsky, Elliot P. ; Neumayr, Lynne D. ; Daniel Armstrong, F. ; Gold, Jeffrey I. ; Kesler, Karen ; Brewer, Joseph ; Weiner, Michael W. / Neuroimaging abnormalities in adults with sickle cell anemia : Associations with cognition. In: Neurology. 2014 ; Vol. 82, No. 10. pp. 835-841.
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