Neurodevelopmental Outcomes of Infant Multivisceral Transplant Recipients: A Longitudinal Study

D. M. Thevenin, A. Baker, T. Kato, A. Tzakis, M. Fernandez, M. Dowling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

This longitudinal investigation compares cognitive and physical capabilities of transplant recipients, both before and after receiving an intestinal transplant. Methods: Using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, we conducted pretransplant and posttransplant assessments on nine children (4 males, 5 females) who received either an isolated intestine, combined intestine and liver, or multivisceral transplants, with a mean age at transplant of 18 months (range 8-29) and a mean time posttransplant of 2 months (range 1-4 months). Results: Scores on the Mental Developmental Index reflected that a majority (55.6%) of patients who scored in the significantly delayed range prior to transplant remained in the significantly delayed classification after receiving a transplant. In addition, 33.3% showed a decrease in their mental classification; either from "mildly delayed" to "significantly delayed" or from "within normal limits" to "mildly delayed". Results on the Motor Developmental Index demonstrated that 78% of recipients had significant delays both before and after receiving a transplant, while 11.1% fell one standard deviation after transplantation. We found that the majority of children who experience developmental delays prior to transplant are still experiencing delays when they are discharged from inpatient care. In addition, those children receiving multivisceral transplantations, as opposed to an isolated bowel, may be at a much greater risk of developing and retaining both cognitive and physical delays. Early neurodevelopmental evaluations of these patients is essential for early parental education and compliance with early intervention services to maximize potential recovery and ability to obtain normal development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1694-1695
Number of pages2
JournalTransplantation proceedings
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2006

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

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