Neurobiologic properties of mood disorders may have an impact on epilepsy: Should this motivate neurologists to screen for this psychiatric comorbidity in these patients?

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Abstract

Epilepsy and psychiatric comorbidities have a complex relation, which can be manifested by their relatively high comorbid occurrence and the existence of a bidirectional relation, whereby not only are people with epilepsy (PWE) at greater risk of developing psychiatric disorders, but patients with primary psychiatric disorders are at higher risk of developing epilepsy. The existence of common pathogenic mechanisms operant in primary psychiatric disorders and epilepsy has been postulated as one of the leading hypothesis to explain their close and very complex relation. The neurobiologic characteristics of mood disorders can be used as a model to test this hypothesis. In this manuscript, we highlight data that suggest how several neurobiologic aspects of mood disorders can facilitate the epileptogenic process in animal models and explain the increased risk of patients with primary mood disorders to develop epilepsy in general and treatment-resistant epilepsy in particular. It is our hope that the inclusion of these data in this Special Issue will motivate neurologists to screen common psychiatric comorbidities in PWE. This article is part of the Special Issue “Obstacles of Treatment of Psychiatric Comorbidities in Epilepsy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEpilepsy and Behavior
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Mood Disorders
Psychiatry
Comorbidity
Epilepsy
Neurologists
Animal Models
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • GABA
  • Glutamate
  • Hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis
  • Major depression
  • Serotonin
  • Temporal lobe epilepsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

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title = "Neurobiologic properties of mood disorders may have an impact on epilepsy: Should this motivate neurologists to screen for this psychiatric comorbidity in these patients?",
abstract = "Epilepsy and psychiatric comorbidities have a complex relation, which can be manifested by their relatively high comorbid occurrence and the existence of a bidirectional relation, whereby not only are people with epilepsy (PWE) at greater risk of developing psychiatric disorders, but patients with primary psychiatric disorders are at higher risk of developing epilepsy. The existence of common pathogenic mechanisms operant in primary psychiatric disorders and epilepsy has been postulated as one of the leading hypothesis to explain their close and very complex relation. The neurobiologic characteristics of mood disorders can be used as a model to test this hypothesis. In this manuscript, we highlight data that suggest how several neurobiologic aspects of mood disorders can facilitate the epileptogenic process in animal models and explain the increased risk of patients with primary mood disorders to develop epilepsy in general and treatment-resistant epilepsy in particular. It is our hope that the inclusion of these data in this Special Issue will motivate neurologists to screen common psychiatric comorbidities in PWE. This article is part of the Special Issue “Obstacles of Treatment of Psychiatric Comorbidities in Epilepsy.",
keywords = "GABA, Glutamate, Hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, Major depression, Serotonin, Temporal lobe epilepsy",
author = "Ramses Ribot and Kanner, {Andres M.}",
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AU - Kanner, Andres M.

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N2 - Epilepsy and psychiatric comorbidities have a complex relation, which can be manifested by their relatively high comorbid occurrence and the existence of a bidirectional relation, whereby not only are people with epilepsy (PWE) at greater risk of developing psychiatric disorders, but patients with primary psychiatric disorders are at higher risk of developing epilepsy. The existence of common pathogenic mechanisms operant in primary psychiatric disorders and epilepsy has been postulated as one of the leading hypothesis to explain their close and very complex relation. The neurobiologic characteristics of mood disorders can be used as a model to test this hypothesis. In this manuscript, we highlight data that suggest how several neurobiologic aspects of mood disorders can facilitate the epileptogenic process in animal models and explain the increased risk of patients with primary mood disorders to develop epilepsy in general and treatment-resistant epilepsy in particular. It is our hope that the inclusion of these data in this Special Issue will motivate neurologists to screen common psychiatric comorbidities in PWE. This article is part of the Special Issue “Obstacles of Treatment of Psychiatric Comorbidities in Epilepsy.

AB - Epilepsy and psychiatric comorbidities have a complex relation, which can be manifested by their relatively high comorbid occurrence and the existence of a bidirectional relation, whereby not only are people with epilepsy (PWE) at greater risk of developing psychiatric disorders, but patients with primary psychiatric disorders are at higher risk of developing epilepsy. The existence of common pathogenic mechanisms operant in primary psychiatric disorders and epilepsy has been postulated as one of the leading hypothesis to explain their close and very complex relation. The neurobiologic characteristics of mood disorders can be used as a model to test this hypothesis. In this manuscript, we highlight data that suggest how several neurobiologic aspects of mood disorders can facilitate the epileptogenic process in animal models and explain the increased risk of patients with primary mood disorders to develop epilepsy in general and treatment-resistant epilepsy in particular. It is our hope that the inclusion of these data in this Special Issue will motivate neurologists to screen common psychiatric comorbidities in PWE. This article is part of the Special Issue “Obstacles of Treatment of Psychiatric Comorbidities in Epilepsy.

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KW - Glutamate

KW - Hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis

KW - Major depression

KW - Serotonin

KW - Temporal lobe epilepsy

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