Neurite growth cone-substratum adherance increases in vitro

Ross W. Gundersen, John Barrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During experiments characterizing the turning response of dorsal root ganglion neurites toward NGF, it was observed that growth cone-substratum adherance increased with time in culture. The experiments reported here indicate that the observed increase in growth cone-substratum adherance is significant and can be detected with both collagen and poly-l-lysine substrates. The increased adherance is apparently due to a substance(s) produced and released by the ganglia which binds to the substrate, increasing adherance. Flow chamber studies indicate that the substrate-bound substance(s) may be necessary for neurite growth onto artificial tissue culture substrata.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-26
Number of pages6
JournalDevelopmental Brain Research
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

Fingerprint

Growth Cones
Neurites
Spinal Ganglia
Nerve Growth Factor
Ganglia
Lysine
Collagen
Growth
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

Neurite growth cone-substratum adherance increases in vitro. / Gundersen, Ross W.; Barrett, John.

In: Developmental Brain Research, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.01.1984, p. 21-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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