Neural processing of reward and loss in girls at risk for major depression

Ian H. Gotlib, Paul Hamilton, Rebecca E. Cooney, Manpreet K. Singh, Melissa L. Henry, Jutta Joormann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

189 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Deficits in reward processing and their neural correlates have been associated with major depression. However, it is unclear if these deficits precede the onset of depression or are a consequence of this disorder. Objective: To determine wheuier anomalous neural processing of reward characterizes children at familial risk for depression in the absence of a personal history of diagnosable disorder. Design: Comparison of neural activity among children at low and high risk for depression as they process reward and loss. Setting: University functional magnetic resonance imaging facility. Participants: Thirteen 10- to 14-year-old never-disordered daughters of mothers with recurrent depression (quot;high riskquot;) and 13 age-matched never-disordered daughters with no family history of depression (quot;low riskquot;). Main Outcome Measure: Neural activity, as measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging, in key reward and attention neural circuitry during anticipation and receipt of reward and loss. Results: While anticipating gains, high-risk participants showed less activation than did their low-risk counterparts in the putamen and left insula but showed greater activation in the right insula. When receiving punishment, high-risk participants showed greater activation in the dorsal anterior cingulate gyrus than did low-risk participants, who showed greater activation in the caudate and putamen. Conclusions: Familial risk for depression affects neural mechanisms underlying the processing of reward and loss; young girls at risk for depression exhibit anomalies in the processing of reward and loss before the onset of depressive symptoms. Longitudinal studies are needed to examine whether these characteristics predict the subsequent onset of depression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)380-387
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of General Psychiatry
Volume67
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2010

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Reward
Depression
Putamen
Nuclear Family
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Punishment
Gyrus Cinguli
Longitudinal Studies
Mothers
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Gotlib, I. H., Hamilton, P., Cooney, R. E., Singh, M. K., Henry, M. L., & Joormann, J. (2010). Neural processing of reward and loss in girls at risk for major depression. Archives of General Psychiatry, 67(4), 380-387. https://doi.org/10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2010.13

Neural processing of reward and loss in girls at risk for major depression. / Gotlib, Ian H.; Hamilton, Paul; Cooney, Rebecca E.; Singh, Manpreet K.; Henry, Melissa L.; Joormann, Jutta.

In: Archives of General Psychiatry, Vol. 67, No. 4, 01.04.2010, p. 380-387.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gotlib, IH, Hamilton, P, Cooney, RE, Singh, MK, Henry, ML & Joormann, J 2010, 'Neural processing of reward and loss in girls at risk for major depression', Archives of General Psychiatry, vol. 67, no. 4, pp. 380-387. https://doi.org/10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2010.13
Gotlib, Ian H. ; Hamilton, Paul ; Cooney, Rebecca E. ; Singh, Manpreet K. ; Henry, Melissa L. ; Joormann, Jutta. / Neural processing of reward and loss in girls at risk for major depression. In: Archives of General Psychiatry. 2010 ; Vol. 67, No. 4. pp. 380-387.
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