Network-Level Correlates of Sexual Risk Among Male Sex Workers in the United States: A Dyadic Analysis

Katie B. Biello, William C. Goedel, Alberto Edeza, Steven A. Safren, Kenneth H. Mayer, Brandon D.L. Marshall, Carl Latkin, Matthew J. Mimiaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Male sex workers (MSWs) are at increased risk of HIV infection in the United States. Research is limited on sexual and drug use network characteristics of MSWs. SETTING: Community-based organization and health center in 2 US Northeast cities. METHODS: One hundred MSWs completed a behavioral assessment and sexual and drug network inventory. Using dyadic analyses, we assessed whether network characteristics, including sex worker-male client age, race, and HIV status homophily and risk multiplexity (ie, overlap in drug-use and sex networks), were associated with condom use. RESULTS: MSW participants' mean age was 33.6. Two-thirds identified as Black or Latino, 12% identified as heterosexual, and 90% reported recent drug use. Participants reported an average of 5.3 male clients in the past month (SD = 3.4), and having anal sex with 74% of these clients, at a rate of 2.2 times per month (SD = 4.6). Participants reported inconsistent condom use during anal sex with 53% of clients. In multivariable models, inconsistent condom use was more common in relationships with presumed HIV status homophily [odds ratio (OR): 1.25; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07 to 1.46] and sexual and drug network multiplexity (OR: 1.19; 95% CI: 1.09 to 1.30); and less common within relationships where the client is older than the MSW participant (OR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.93). Number of multiplex relationships was positively associated with number of condomless anal sex acts with male clients (incidence rate ratio: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.19 to 1.54). CONCLUSIONS: Network characteristics may contribute to disproportionate HIV risk among MSWs. Modeling studies should include network characteristics when simulating HIV transmission, and future HIV interventions should address the role of networks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-118
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)
Volume83
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2020

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Sex Workers
HIV
Condoms
Sexual Behavior
Confidence Intervals
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Odds Ratio
Heterosexuality
Hispanic Americans
HIV Infections
Organizations
Equipment and Supplies
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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Network-Level Correlates of Sexual Risk Among Male Sex Workers in the United States : A Dyadic Analysis. / Biello, Katie B.; Goedel, William C.; Edeza, Alberto; Safren, Steven A.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Marshall, Brandon D.L.; Latkin, Carl; Mimiaga, Matthew J.

In: Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999), Vol. 83, No. 2, 01.02.2020, p. 111-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Biello, Katie B. ; Goedel, William C. ; Edeza, Alberto ; Safren, Steven A. ; Mayer, Kenneth H. ; Marshall, Brandon D.L. ; Latkin, Carl ; Mimiaga, Matthew J. / Network-Level Correlates of Sexual Risk Among Male Sex Workers in the United States : A Dyadic Analysis. In: Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999). 2020 ; Vol. 83, No. 2. pp. 111-118.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Male sex workers (MSWs) are at increased risk of HIV infection in the United States. Research is limited on sexual and drug use network characteristics of MSWs. SETTING: Community-based organization and health center in 2 US Northeast cities. METHODS: One hundred MSWs completed a behavioral assessment and sexual and drug network inventory. Using dyadic analyses, we assessed whether network characteristics, including sex worker-male client age, race, and HIV status homophily and risk multiplexity (ie, overlap in drug-use and sex networks), were associated with condom use. RESULTS: MSW participants' mean age was 33.6. Two-thirds identified as Black or Latino, 12{\%} identified as heterosexual, and 90{\%} reported recent drug use. Participants reported an average of 5.3 male clients in the past month (SD = 3.4), and having anal sex with 74{\%} of these clients, at a rate of 2.2 times per month (SD = 4.6). Participants reported inconsistent condom use during anal sex with 53{\%} of clients. In multivariable models, inconsistent condom use was more common in relationships with presumed HIV status homophily [odds ratio (OR): 1.25; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 1.07 to 1.46] and sexual and drug network multiplexity (OR: 1.19; 95{\%} CI: 1.09 to 1.30); and less common within relationships where the client is older than the MSW participant (OR: 0.83; 95{\%} CI: 0.74 to 0.93). Number of multiplex relationships was positively associated with number of condomless anal sex acts with male clients (incidence rate ratio: 1.35; 95{\%} CI: 1.19 to 1.54). CONCLUSIONS: Network characteristics may contribute to disproportionate HIV risk among MSWs. Modeling studies should include network characteristics when simulating HIV transmission, and future HIV interventions should address the role of networks.",
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AU - Biello, Katie B.

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AU - Safren, Steven A.

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AU - Marshall, Brandon D.L.

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AB - BACKGROUND: Male sex workers (MSWs) are at increased risk of HIV infection in the United States. Research is limited on sexual and drug use network characteristics of MSWs. SETTING: Community-based organization and health center in 2 US Northeast cities. METHODS: One hundred MSWs completed a behavioral assessment and sexual and drug network inventory. Using dyadic analyses, we assessed whether network characteristics, including sex worker-male client age, race, and HIV status homophily and risk multiplexity (ie, overlap in drug-use and sex networks), were associated with condom use. RESULTS: MSW participants' mean age was 33.6. Two-thirds identified as Black or Latino, 12% identified as heterosexual, and 90% reported recent drug use. Participants reported an average of 5.3 male clients in the past month (SD = 3.4), and having anal sex with 74% of these clients, at a rate of 2.2 times per month (SD = 4.6). Participants reported inconsistent condom use during anal sex with 53% of clients. In multivariable models, inconsistent condom use was more common in relationships with presumed HIV status homophily [odds ratio (OR): 1.25; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07 to 1.46] and sexual and drug network multiplexity (OR: 1.19; 95% CI: 1.09 to 1.30); and less common within relationships where the client is older than the MSW participant (OR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.93). Number of multiplex relationships was positively associated with number of condomless anal sex acts with male clients (incidence rate ratio: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.19 to 1.54). CONCLUSIONS: Network characteristics may contribute to disproportionate HIV risk among MSWs. Modeling studies should include network characteristics when simulating HIV transmission, and future HIV interventions should address the role of networks.

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