Neighborhood immigrant concentration, acculturation, and cultural alienation in former Soviet immigrant women

Arlene Michaels Miller, Dina Birman, Shannon Zenk, Edward Wang, Olga Sorokin, Jorgia Connor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several acculturation theories note the importance of surrounding context, but few studies describe neighborhood influences on immigrant adaptation. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships among neighborhood immigrant concentration, acculturation, and alienation for 151 women aged 44-80 from the former Soviet Union who lived in the US fewer than 13 years. Participants resided in 65 census tracts in the Chicago area with varying concentrations of Russian-speaking and diverse immigrants. Results from self-report questionnaires suggest that the effect of acculturation on alienation varies depending on neighborhood characteristics. The study also demonstrates the complexity of individual and contextual influences on immigrant adoption. Understanding these relationships is important for developing community-based and neighborhood-level interventions to enhance the mental health of immigrants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-105
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Community Psychology
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Acculturation
USSR
Censuses
Self Report
Mental Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Neighborhood immigrant concentration, acculturation, and cultural alienation in former Soviet immigrant women. / Miller, Arlene Michaels; Birman, Dina; Zenk, Shannon; Wang, Edward; Sorokin, Olga; Connor, Jorgia.

In: Journal of Community Psychology, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.2009, p. 88-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, Arlene Michaels ; Birman, Dina ; Zenk, Shannon ; Wang, Edward ; Sorokin, Olga ; Connor, Jorgia. / Neighborhood immigrant concentration, acculturation, and cultural alienation in former Soviet immigrant women. In: Journal of Community Psychology. 2009 ; Vol. 37, No. 1. pp. 88-105.
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