Necrotizing fasciitis following endoscopic harvesting of the greater saphenous vein for coronary artery bypass graft

Benjamin Liliav, Danny Yakoub, Armen Kasabian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The greater saphenous vein (GSV) remains the most commonly harvested conduit for revascularization in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Published literature shows that minimally invasive vein harvesting techniques have a significantly lower incidence of wound infection rates than conventional open vein harvesting techniques have. We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis, an infection with a mortality rate of 30% to 50%, after endoscopic harvesting of the greater saphenous vein to be used as a conduit in a CABG procedure. Though minimally invasive vein harvesting techniques have advantages of smaller incisions and a decreased overall rate of wound infection, clinicians should be aware of this potentially lethal infection that may occur.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-95
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

Keywords

  • CABG
  • GSV harvesting
  • Necrotizing fasciitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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