Naturalized philosophy of science and natural science education

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A major controversy in contemporary philosophy of science concerns the possibility and desirability of its 'naturalization.' In this paper I review the philosophical controversy concerning naturalism, and investigate the role it might play in the science classroom. I argue that science students can benefit from explicit study of this controversy, and from explicit consideration of the extent to which philosophy of science can be studied naturalistically. More specifically, I suggest that such consideration can enhance students' understanding of the nature of 'natural' science, of the nature and importance of philosophy of science, and of the relationship between the two - and that these benefits accrue to science education whichever philosophical view concerning naturalization proves to be correct. My hope is that the paper demonstrates the benefits to be gained from explicit consideration in the science classroom of an important issue in the philosophy of science.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-68
Number of pages12
JournalScience & Education
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1993
Externally publishedYes

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philosophy of science
natural sciences
naturalization
science
education
naturalism
classroom
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Naturalized philosophy of science and natural science education. / Siegel, Harvey.

In: Science & Education, Vol. 2, No. 1, 03.1993, p. 57-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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