Natural history of pruritus in primary biliary cirrhosis

Jayant A. Talwalkar, Enrico Souto, Roberta A. Jorgensen, Keith D. Lindor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The natural history of pruritus in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) remains poorly defined. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate outcomes of pruritus in clinical trials for ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). In a UDCA-placebo trial begun in 1988 (n = 180), a 55% prevalence rate for pruritus was observed. Serum alkaline phosphatase level and Mayo risk score were independent risk factors for pruritus (P < 0.0001). Among placebo-treated patients (n = 91), the annual risks for development or improvement/resolution of pruritus were 27% and 23%, respectively. For UDCA-treated patients (n = 89), a trend toward improvement in pruritus was observed after 1 year compared to placebo (30% vs. 23%, P = 0.08) but not at 2 or 3 years. In a 3-dose UDCA trial begun in 1995 (n = 155), the overall prevalence of pruritus was significantly lower at 37% when compared to UDCA-placebo participants (P < 0.001). Baseline serum alkaline phosphatase level and Mayo risk score were again independent risk factors for pruritus (P < 0.0001). Among 13 (3.9%) patients with refractory pruritus, symptom resolution (n = 5) or improvement (n = 8) was associated with the use of oral rifampin (300 or 600 mg daily). Two patients treated with rifampin developed biochemical evidence for hepatotoxicity necessitating drug withdrawal. Although less prevalent among recently diagnosed individuals, more than one third of PBC patients develop pruritus. No significant risk reduction in developing pruritus with UDCA therapy was observed compared to placebo-treated patients. The long-term administration of rifampin for refractory pruritus is associated with occasional hepatotoxicity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)297-302
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume1
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Biliary Liver Cirrhosis
Pruritus
Ursodeoxycholic Acid
Placebos
Rifampin
Alkaline Phosphatase
Risk Reduction Behavior
Serum
Clinical Trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Natural history of pruritus in primary biliary cirrhosis. / Talwalkar, Jayant A.; Souto, Enrico; Jorgensen, Roberta A.; Lindor, Keith D.

In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vol. 1, No. 4, 01.07.2003, p. 297-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Talwalkar, Jayant A. ; Souto, Enrico ; Jorgensen, Roberta A. ; Lindor, Keith D. / Natural history of pruritus in primary biliary cirrhosis. In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2003 ; Vol. 1, No. 4. pp. 297-302.
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