Natural and anthropogenic sources of bromoform and dibromomethane in the oceanographic and biogeochemical regime of the subtropical North East Atlantic

Melina Mehlmann, Birgit Quack, Elliot Atlas, Helmke Hepach, Susann Tegtmeier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The organic bromine compounds bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2) influence tropospheric chemistry and stratospheric ozone depletion. Their atmospheric abundance is generally related to a common marine source, which is not well characterized. A cruise between the three Macaroenesian Archipelagos of Cape Verde, the Canaries and Madeira revealed that anthropogenic sources increased oceanic CHBr3 emissions significantly close to some islands, especially at the Canaries, while heterotrophic processes in the ocean increased the flux of CH2Br2 from the sea to the atmosphere in the Cape Verde region. As anthropogenic disinfection processes, which release CHBr3 in coastal areas increase, and as more CH2Br2 may be produced from increased heterotrophy in a warming, deoxygenated ocean, both sources could supply higher fractions of stratospheric bromine in the future, with yet unknown consequences for stratospheric ozone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)679-707
Number of pages29
JournalEnvironmental Science: Processes and Impacts
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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