Native American race, use of the Indian Health Service, and breast and lung cancer survival in Florida, 1996-2007

David J. Lee, Stacey L. Tannenbaum, Tulay Koru-Sengu, Feng Miao, Wei Zhao, Margaret M. Byrne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

We evaluated associations of race, primary payer at diagnosis, and survival among patients diagnosed in Florida with lung cancer (n = 148,140) and breast cancer (n = 111,795), from 1996 through 2007. In multivariate models adjusted for comorbidities, tumor characteristics, and treatment factors, breast cancer survival was worse for Native American women than for white women (hazard ratio [HR], 1.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-2.20) and for women using the Indian Health Service than for women using private insurance (HR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.33-2.19). No survival association was found for Native American compared with white lung cancer patients or those using the Indian Health Service versus private insurance in fully adjusted models. Additional resources are needed to improve surveillance strategies and to reduce cancer burden in these populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number130162
JournalPreventing Chronic Disease
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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