National trends in ambulatory surgery for intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis: A 12-year analysis of the national surveys of ambulatory surgery

Matthew J. Best, Leonard T. Buller, Frank J Eismont

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Design. A descriptive epidemiology study. Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate changes in the utilization of ambulatory surgical procedures performed for intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis between 1994 and 2006 in the United States. Summary of Background Data. Understanding trends in the utilization of ambulatory spine surgery may improve health care delivery in the Unites States. Epidemiologic studies evaluating national practice patterns for ambulatory spine surgery are limited. Methods. The National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery conducted in 1994, 1996, and 2006 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was analyzed to identify surgically managed patients with intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis. Patients were divided into 1 of 3 groups: discectomy, laminectomy, or fusion. The data were analyzed for trends in demographics, treatment, and utilization. Results. Between 1994 and 2006, the number of procedures increased by 540% for intervertebral disc disorders (6.1/100 000 capita to 34.2/100 000 capita) and 926% for spinal stenosis (0.38/100 000 capita to 3.46 per 100 000 capita). Intervertebral fusions increased from 5% of outpatient spine surgeries in 1994 to 17% in 2006. The utilization of freestanding ambulatory facilities as the location of surgery increased 340% for intervertebral disc disorders and more than 2000% for stenosis. Private insurance was the largest compensator, representing 91% of cases in 2006. An increasing proportion of females underwent surgery for intervertebral disc disorders and stenosis at these ambulatory facilities over this time period. Lumbar disc displacement remained the most common diagnosis at each time point. Conclusions. The rate of ambulatory surgery for intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis increased dramatically between 1994 and 2006 based upon the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery data, which are the most up-to-date ambulatory surgery data available. These findings may aid policy-makers and caregivers in allocating health care resources to ensure the delivery of quality patient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1703-1711
Number of pages9
JournalSpine
Volume40
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 27 2015

Fingerprint

Spinal Stenosis
compound A 12
Intervertebral Disc
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Spine
Pathologic Constriction
Delivery of Health Care
Diskectomy
Laminectomy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Quality of Health Care
Health Resources
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Insurance
Administrative Personnel
Caregivers
Epidemiologic Studies
Patient Care
Epidemiology
Demography

Keywords

  • Ambulatory surgery
  • Discectomy
  • Epidemiology
  • Fusion
  • Insurance
  • Intervertebral disc disorder
  • Laminectomy
  • National trends
  • Outpatient
  • Stenosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

National trends in ambulatory surgery for intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis : A 12-year analysis of the national surveys of ambulatory surgery. / Best, Matthew J.; Buller, Leonard T.; Eismont, Frank J.

In: Spine, Vol. 40, No. 21, 27.10.2015, p. 1703-1711.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "National trends in ambulatory surgery for intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis: A 12-year analysis of the national surveys of ambulatory surgery",
abstract = "Study Design. A descriptive epidemiology study. Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate changes in the utilization of ambulatory surgical procedures performed for intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis between 1994 and 2006 in the United States. Summary of Background Data. Understanding trends in the utilization of ambulatory spine surgery may improve health care delivery in the Unites States. Epidemiologic studies evaluating national practice patterns for ambulatory spine surgery are limited. Methods. The National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery conducted in 1994, 1996, and 2006 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was analyzed to identify surgically managed patients with intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis. Patients were divided into 1 of 3 groups: discectomy, laminectomy, or fusion. The data were analyzed for trends in demographics, treatment, and utilization. Results. Between 1994 and 2006, the number of procedures increased by 540{\%} for intervertebral disc disorders (6.1/100 000 capita to 34.2/100 000 capita) and 926{\%} for spinal stenosis (0.38/100 000 capita to 3.46 per 100 000 capita). Intervertebral fusions increased from 5{\%} of outpatient spine surgeries in 1994 to 17{\%} in 2006. The utilization of freestanding ambulatory facilities as the location of surgery increased 340{\%} for intervertebral disc disorders and more than 2000{\%} for stenosis. Private insurance was the largest compensator, representing 91{\%} of cases in 2006. An increasing proportion of females underwent surgery for intervertebral disc disorders and stenosis at these ambulatory facilities over this time period. Lumbar disc displacement remained the most common diagnosis at each time point. Conclusions. The rate of ambulatory surgery for intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis increased dramatically between 1994 and 2006 based upon the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery data, which are the most up-to-date ambulatory surgery data available. These findings may aid policy-makers and caregivers in allocating health care resources to ensure the delivery of quality patient care.",
keywords = "Ambulatory surgery, Discectomy, Epidemiology, Fusion, Insurance, Intervertebral disc disorder, Laminectomy, National trends, Outpatient, Stenosis",
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T1 - National trends in ambulatory surgery for intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis

T2 - A 12-year analysis of the national surveys of ambulatory surgery

AU - Best, Matthew J.

AU - Buller, Leonard T.

AU - Eismont, Frank J

PY - 2015/10/27

Y1 - 2015/10/27

N2 - Study Design. A descriptive epidemiology study. Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate changes in the utilization of ambulatory surgical procedures performed for intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis between 1994 and 2006 in the United States. Summary of Background Data. Understanding trends in the utilization of ambulatory spine surgery may improve health care delivery in the Unites States. Epidemiologic studies evaluating national practice patterns for ambulatory spine surgery are limited. Methods. The National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery conducted in 1994, 1996, and 2006 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was analyzed to identify surgically managed patients with intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis. Patients were divided into 1 of 3 groups: discectomy, laminectomy, or fusion. The data were analyzed for trends in demographics, treatment, and utilization. Results. Between 1994 and 2006, the number of procedures increased by 540% for intervertebral disc disorders (6.1/100 000 capita to 34.2/100 000 capita) and 926% for spinal stenosis (0.38/100 000 capita to 3.46 per 100 000 capita). Intervertebral fusions increased from 5% of outpatient spine surgeries in 1994 to 17% in 2006. The utilization of freestanding ambulatory facilities as the location of surgery increased 340% for intervertebral disc disorders and more than 2000% for stenosis. Private insurance was the largest compensator, representing 91% of cases in 2006. An increasing proportion of females underwent surgery for intervertebral disc disorders and stenosis at these ambulatory facilities over this time period. Lumbar disc displacement remained the most common diagnosis at each time point. Conclusions. The rate of ambulatory surgery for intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis increased dramatically between 1994 and 2006 based upon the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery data, which are the most up-to-date ambulatory surgery data available. These findings may aid policy-makers and caregivers in allocating health care resources to ensure the delivery of quality patient care.

AB - Study Design. A descriptive epidemiology study. Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate changes in the utilization of ambulatory surgical procedures performed for intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis between 1994 and 2006 in the United States. Summary of Background Data. Understanding trends in the utilization of ambulatory spine surgery may improve health care delivery in the Unites States. Epidemiologic studies evaluating national practice patterns for ambulatory spine surgery are limited. Methods. The National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery conducted in 1994, 1996, and 2006 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was analyzed to identify surgically managed patients with intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis. Patients were divided into 1 of 3 groups: discectomy, laminectomy, or fusion. The data were analyzed for trends in demographics, treatment, and utilization. Results. Between 1994 and 2006, the number of procedures increased by 540% for intervertebral disc disorders (6.1/100 000 capita to 34.2/100 000 capita) and 926% for spinal stenosis (0.38/100 000 capita to 3.46 per 100 000 capita). Intervertebral fusions increased from 5% of outpatient spine surgeries in 1994 to 17% in 2006. The utilization of freestanding ambulatory facilities as the location of surgery increased 340% for intervertebral disc disorders and more than 2000% for stenosis. Private insurance was the largest compensator, representing 91% of cases in 2006. An increasing proportion of females underwent surgery for intervertebral disc disorders and stenosis at these ambulatory facilities over this time period. Lumbar disc displacement remained the most common diagnosis at each time point. Conclusions. The rate of ambulatory surgery for intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis increased dramatically between 1994 and 2006 based upon the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery data, which are the most up-to-date ambulatory surgery data available. These findings may aid policy-makers and caregivers in allocating health care resources to ensure the delivery of quality patient care.

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KW - Epidemiology

KW - Fusion

KW - Insurance

KW - Intervertebral disc disorder

KW - Laminectomy

KW - National trends

KW - Outpatient

KW - Stenosis

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