Nanostructures: A platform for brain repair and augmentation

Ruxandra Vidu, Masoud Rahman, Morteza Mahmoudi, Marius Enachescu, Teodor D. Poteca, Ioan Opris

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nanoscale structures have been at the core of research efforts dealing with integration of nanotechnology into novel electronic devices for the last decade. Because the size of nanomaterials is of the same order of magnitude as biomolecules, these materials are valuable tools for nanoscale manipulation in a broad range of neurobiological systems. For instance, the unique electrical and optical properties of nanowires, nanotubes, and nanocables with vertical orientation, assembled in nanoscale arrays, have been used in many device applications such as sensors that hold the potential to augment brain functions. However, the challenge in creating nanowires/nanotubes or nanocables array- based sensors lies in making individual electrical connections fitting both the features of the brain and of the nanostructures. This review discusses two of the most important applications of nanostructures in neuroscience. First, the current approaches to create nanowires and nanocable structures are reviewed to critically evaluate their potential for developing unique nanostructure based sensors to improve recording and device performance to reduce noise and the detrimental effect of the interface on the tissue. Second, the implementation of nanomaterials in neurobiological and medical applications will be considered from the brain augmentation perspective. Novel applications for diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases such as multiple sclerosis, meningitis, stroke, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and autism will be considered. Because the blood brain barrier (BBB) has a defensive mechanism in preventing nanomaterials arrival to the brain, various strategies to help them to pass through the BBB will be discussed. Finally, the implementation of nanomaterials in neurobiological applications is addressed from the brain repair/augmentation perspective. These nanostructures at the interface between nanotechnology and neuroscience will play a pivotal role not only in addressing the multitude of brain disorders but also to repair or augment brain functions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number91
JournalFrontiers in Systems Neuroscience
Volume8
Issue numberJUNE
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 20 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nanostructures
Brain
Nanowires
Nanotubes
Nanotechnology
Brain Diseases
Neurosciences
Blood-Brain Barrier
Equipment and Supplies
Autistic Disorder
Meningitis
Multiple Sclerosis
Noise
Epilepsy
Schizophrenia
Alzheimer Disease
Stroke
Research

Keywords

  • Blood brain barrier
  • Brain activity mapping
  • Brain repair and augmentation
  • Carbon nanotube
  • Inter-laminar microcircuit
  • Multi-electrode array
  • Nano-imprint lithography
  • Nanotechnology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Nanostructures : A platform for brain repair and augmentation. / Vidu, Ruxandra; Rahman, Masoud; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Enachescu, Marius; Poteca, Teodor D.; Opris, Ioan.

In: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, Vol. 8, No. JUNE, 91, 20.07.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Vidu, Ruxandra ; Rahman, Masoud ; Mahmoudi, Morteza ; Enachescu, Marius ; Poteca, Teodor D. ; Opris, Ioan. / Nanostructures : A platform for brain repair and augmentation. In: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience. 2014 ; Vol. 8, No. JUNE.
@article{bb41c9c929834aeb8674c17b042597ac,
title = "Nanostructures: A platform for brain repair and augmentation",
abstract = "Nanoscale structures have been at the core of research efforts dealing with integration of nanotechnology into novel electronic devices for the last decade. Because the size of nanomaterials is of the same order of magnitude as biomolecules, these materials are valuable tools for nanoscale manipulation in a broad range of neurobiological systems. For instance, the unique electrical and optical properties of nanowires, nanotubes, and nanocables with vertical orientation, assembled in nanoscale arrays, have been used in many device applications such as sensors that hold the potential to augment brain functions. However, the challenge in creating nanowires/nanotubes or nanocables array- based sensors lies in making individual electrical connections fitting both the features of the brain and of the nanostructures. This review discusses two of the most important applications of nanostructures in neuroscience. First, the current approaches to create nanowires and nanocable structures are reviewed to critically evaluate their potential for developing unique nanostructure based sensors to improve recording and device performance to reduce noise and the detrimental effect of the interface on the tissue. Second, the implementation of nanomaterials in neurobiological and medical applications will be considered from the brain augmentation perspective. Novel applications for diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases such as multiple sclerosis, meningitis, stroke, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and autism will be considered. Because the blood brain barrier (BBB) has a defensive mechanism in preventing nanomaterials arrival to the brain, various strategies to help them to pass through the BBB will be discussed. Finally, the implementation of nanomaterials in neurobiological applications is addressed from the brain repair/augmentation perspective. These nanostructures at the interface between nanotechnology and neuroscience will play a pivotal role not only in addressing the multitude of brain disorders but also to repair or augment brain functions.",
keywords = "Blood brain barrier, Brain activity mapping, Brain repair and augmentation, Carbon nanotube, Inter-laminar microcircuit, Multi-electrode array, Nano-imprint lithography, Nanotechnology",
author = "Ruxandra Vidu and Masoud Rahman and Morteza Mahmoudi and Marius Enachescu and Poteca, {Teodor D.} and Ioan Opris",
year = "2014",
month = "7",
day = "20",
doi = "10.3389/fnsys.2014.00091",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
journal = "Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience",
issn = "1662-5137",
publisher = "Frontiers Research Foundation",
number = "JUNE",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nanostructures

T2 - A platform for brain repair and augmentation

AU - Vidu, Ruxandra

AU - Rahman, Masoud

AU - Mahmoudi, Morteza

AU - Enachescu, Marius

AU - Poteca, Teodor D.

AU - Opris, Ioan

PY - 2014/7/20

Y1 - 2014/7/20

N2 - Nanoscale structures have been at the core of research efforts dealing with integration of nanotechnology into novel electronic devices for the last decade. Because the size of nanomaterials is of the same order of magnitude as biomolecules, these materials are valuable tools for nanoscale manipulation in a broad range of neurobiological systems. For instance, the unique electrical and optical properties of nanowires, nanotubes, and nanocables with vertical orientation, assembled in nanoscale arrays, have been used in many device applications such as sensors that hold the potential to augment brain functions. However, the challenge in creating nanowires/nanotubes or nanocables array- based sensors lies in making individual electrical connections fitting both the features of the brain and of the nanostructures. This review discusses two of the most important applications of nanostructures in neuroscience. First, the current approaches to create nanowires and nanocable structures are reviewed to critically evaluate their potential for developing unique nanostructure based sensors to improve recording and device performance to reduce noise and the detrimental effect of the interface on the tissue. Second, the implementation of nanomaterials in neurobiological and medical applications will be considered from the brain augmentation perspective. Novel applications for diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases such as multiple sclerosis, meningitis, stroke, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and autism will be considered. Because the blood brain barrier (BBB) has a defensive mechanism in preventing nanomaterials arrival to the brain, various strategies to help them to pass through the BBB will be discussed. Finally, the implementation of nanomaterials in neurobiological applications is addressed from the brain repair/augmentation perspective. These nanostructures at the interface between nanotechnology and neuroscience will play a pivotal role not only in addressing the multitude of brain disorders but also to repair or augment brain functions.

AB - Nanoscale structures have been at the core of research efforts dealing with integration of nanotechnology into novel electronic devices for the last decade. Because the size of nanomaterials is of the same order of magnitude as biomolecules, these materials are valuable tools for nanoscale manipulation in a broad range of neurobiological systems. For instance, the unique electrical and optical properties of nanowires, nanotubes, and nanocables with vertical orientation, assembled in nanoscale arrays, have been used in many device applications such as sensors that hold the potential to augment brain functions. However, the challenge in creating nanowires/nanotubes or nanocables array- based sensors lies in making individual electrical connections fitting both the features of the brain and of the nanostructures. This review discusses two of the most important applications of nanostructures in neuroscience. First, the current approaches to create nanowires and nanocable structures are reviewed to critically evaluate their potential for developing unique nanostructure based sensors to improve recording and device performance to reduce noise and the detrimental effect of the interface on the tissue. Second, the implementation of nanomaterials in neurobiological and medical applications will be considered from the brain augmentation perspective. Novel applications for diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases such as multiple sclerosis, meningitis, stroke, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and autism will be considered. Because the blood brain barrier (BBB) has a defensive mechanism in preventing nanomaterials arrival to the brain, various strategies to help them to pass through the BBB will be discussed. Finally, the implementation of nanomaterials in neurobiological applications is addressed from the brain repair/augmentation perspective. These nanostructures at the interface between nanotechnology and neuroscience will play a pivotal role not only in addressing the multitude of brain disorders but also to repair or augment brain functions.

KW - Blood brain barrier

KW - Brain activity mapping

KW - Brain repair and augmentation

KW - Carbon nanotube

KW - Inter-laminar microcircuit

KW - Multi-electrode array

KW - Nano-imprint lithography

KW - Nanotechnology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84928144456&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84928144456&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3389/fnsys.2014.00091

DO - 10.3389/fnsys.2014.00091

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:84928144456

VL - 8

JO - Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience

JF - Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience

SN - 1662-5137

IS - JUNE

M1 - 91

ER -