Naming in dementia secondary to Parkinson's, Huntington's, Alzheimer's diseases

Elaine M. Frank, Hiram L. McDade, William K. Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Confrontation naming problems have been found in patients with dementia secondary to Alzheimer's (AD), Huntington's (HD), and in a subset of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with dementia. The source of the naming deficit has not been established. The "Perception" and the "Semantic Feature" theories have been proposed to explain this naming dysfunction. Subjects with dementia secondary to AD, HD, and PD were given three tasks to determine which theory best explained the source of confrontation naming problems. The three tasks including picture matching, visual recognition, and confrontation naming were given to 42 subjects with dementia secondary to AD, HD, and PD controlled for severity of dementia, and to age-matched controls. Subjects with dementia did not have significantly more difficulty matching pictures but did have more difficulty associating pictures through semantic features. Subjects with mild dementia secondary to AD and HD had significantly more confrontation naming errors than subjects with mild dementia secondary to PD and normal controls. All subjects with moderate dementia had significantly more confrontation naming errors than normal controls. Statistical power may have been limited due to the small number of subjects in each group. The source of the reduction in confrontation naming performance in subjects with dementia secondary to AD, HD, and PD originated in the deterioration of semantic fields. The perception theory was rejected as findings were consistent with the semantic feature theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-197
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Communication Disorders
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • LPN and LVN
  • Speech and Hearing

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