Myogenic influences on the electrical auditory brainstem response (EABR) in humans

Robert Fifer, M. A. Novak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two cases demonstrating the effects of myogenic artifact on the electrical auditory brainstem response (EABR) when using a promontory stimulation site are presented. Intensity-response functions were obtained in the unparalyzed condition, then repeated after infusion of a neuromuscular paralyzing agent. In both cases, the myogenic response was observed at lower stimulus intensities than the EABR components. As intensity increased, the myogenic responses grew at extremely rapid rates and made any subsequent identification of auditory responses virtually impossible. To alleviate the adverse influence of myogenic components, general anesthesia and a paralyzing agent must be incorporated into the test protocol when acquiring the EABR using a promontory site of stimulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1180-1184
Number of pages5
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume100
Issue number11
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

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Brain Stem Auditory Evoked Potentials
Neuromuscular Agents
Artifacts
General Anesthesia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Myogenic influences on the electrical auditory brainstem response (EABR) in humans. / Fifer, Robert; Novak, M. A.

In: Laryngoscope, Vol. 100, No. 11, 01.01.1990, p. 1180-1184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fifer, R & Novak, MA 1990, 'Myogenic influences on the electrical auditory brainstem response (EABR) in humans', Laryngoscope, vol. 100, no. 11, pp. 1180-1184.
Fifer, Robert ; Novak, M. A. / Myogenic influences on the electrical auditory brainstem response (EABR) in humans. In: Laryngoscope. 1990 ; Vol. 100, No. 11. pp. 1180-1184.
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