Myeloid suppressor cells in cancer: Recruitment, phenotype, properties, and mechanisms of immune suppression

Paolo Serafini, Ivan Borrello, Vincenzo Bronte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

579 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Growing tumors acquire the ability to resist immune recognition and immune-mediated injury. Among several mechanisms, mouse and human tumors share the ability to alter the normal hematopoiesis, leading to accumulation of cells of the myelo-monoctytic lineage at the tumor site and in different primary and secondary lymphoid organs. These cells aid tumor development by providing molecules and factors essential for tumor growth and neovascularization but also exert a profound inhibitory activity on both tumor-specific and nonspecific T lymphocytes. The present article summarizes recent findings on the interaction between developing cancers and these recently described "myeloid suppressor cells".

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-65
Number of pages13
JournalSeminars in Cancer Biology
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Myeloid Cells
Phenotype
Neoplasms
Hematopoiesis
T-Lymphocytes
Wounds and Injuries
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Myeloid suppressor cells in cancer : Recruitment, phenotype, properties, and mechanisms of immune suppression. / Serafini, Paolo; Borrello, Ivan; Bronte, Vincenzo.

In: Seminars in Cancer Biology, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.02.2006, p. 53-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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