Myeloid cell transmigration across the CNS vasculature triggers IL-1ß-driven neuroinflammation during autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice

Sébastien A. Lévesque, Alexandre Paré, Benoit Mailhot, Victor Bellver-Landete, Hania Kébir, Marc André Lécuyer, Jorge Ivan Alvarez, Alexandre Prat, Juan Pablo P de Rivero Vaccari, Robert Keane, Steve Lacroix

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Growing evidence supports a role for IL-1 in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), but how it impacts neuroinflammation is poorly understood. We show that susceptibility to EAE requires activation of IL-1R1 on radiation-resistant cells via IL-1ß secreted by bone marrow-derived cells. Neutrophils and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) are the main source of IL-1ß and produce this cytokine as a result of their transmigration across the inflamed blood-spinal cord barrier. IL-1R1 expression in the spinal cord is found in endothelial cells (ECs) of the pial venous plexus. Accordingly, leukocyte infiltration at EAE onset is restricted to IL-1R1+ subpial and subarachnoid vessels. In response to IL-1ß, primary cultures of central nervous system ECs produce GM-CSF, G-CSF, IL-6, Cxcl1, and Cxcl2. Initiation of EAE or subdural injection of IL-1ß induces a similar cytokine/chemokine signature in spinal cord vessels. Furthermore, the transfer of Gr1+ cells on the spinal cord is sufficient to induce illness in EAE-resistant IL-1ß knockout (KO) mice. Notably, transfer of Gr1+ cells isolated from C57BL/6 mice induce massive recruitment of recipient myeloid cells compared with cells from IL-1ß KO donors, and this recruitment translates into more severe paralysis. These findings suggest that an IL-1ß-dependent paracrine loop between infiltrated neutrophils/MDMs and ECs drives neuroinflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)929-949
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Experimental Medicine
Volume213
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

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Encephalomyelitis
Myeloid Cells
Interleukin-1
Autoimmune Experimental Encephalomyelitis
Spinal Cord
Endothelial Cells
Neutrophils
Macrophages
Cytokines
Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Chemokines
Knockout Mice
Paralysis
Bone Marrow Cells
Multiple Sclerosis
Interleukin-6
Leukocytes
Central Nervous System

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Myeloid cell transmigration across the CNS vasculature triggers IL-1ß-driven neuroinflammation during autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice. / Lévesque, Sébastien A.; Paré, Alexandre; Mailhot, Benoit; Bellver-Landete, Victor; Kébir, Hania; Lécuyer, Marc André; Alvarez, Jorge Ivan; Prat, Alexandre; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo P; Keane, Robert; Lacroix, Steve.

In: Journal of Experimental Medicine, Vol. 213, No. 6, 01.05.2016, p. 929-949.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lévesque, Sébastien A. ; Paré, Alexandre ; Mailhot, Benoit ; Bellver-Landete, Victor ; Kébir, Hania ; Lécuyer, Marc André ; Alvarez, Jorge Ivan ; Prat, Alexandre ; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo P ; Keane, Robert ; Lacroix, Steve. / Myeloid cell transmigration across the CNS vasculature triggers IL-1ß-driven neuroinflammation during autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice. In: Journal of Experimental Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 213, No. 6. pp. 929-949.
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AU - Mailhot, Benoit

AU - Bellver-Landete, Victor

AU - Kébir, Hania

AU - Lécuyer, Marc André

AU - Alvarez, Jorge Ivan

AU - Prat, Alexandre

AU - de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo P

AU - Keane, Robert

AU - Lacroix, Steve

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AB - Growing evidence supports a role for IL-1 in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), but how it impacts neuroinflammation is poorly understood. We show that susceptibility to EAE requires activation of IL-1R1 on radiation-resistant cells via IL-1ß secreted by bone marrow-derived cells. Neutrophils and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) are the main source of IL-1ß and produce this cytokine as a result of their transmigration across the inflamed blood-spinal cord barrier. IL-1R1 expression in the spinal cord is found in endothelial cells (ECs) of the pial venous plexus. Accordingly, leukocyte infiltration at EAE onset is restricted to IL-1R1+ subpial and subarachnoid vessels. In response to IL-1ß, primary cultures of central nervous system ECs produce GM-CSF, G-CSF, IL-6, Cxcl1, and Cxcl2. Initiation of EAE or subdural injection of IL-1ß induces a similar cytokine/chemokine signature in spinal cord vessels. Furthermore, the transfer of Gr1+ cells on the spinal cord is sufficient to induce illness in EAE-resistant IL-1ß knockout (KO) mice. Notably, transfer of Gr1+ cells isolated from C57BL/6 mice induce massive recruitment of recipient myeloid cells compared with cells from IL-1ß KO donors, and this recruitment translates into more severe paralysis. These findings suggest that an IL-1ß-dependent paracrine loop between infiltrated neutrophils/MDMs and ECs drives neuroinflammation.

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