Mutant laboratory mice with abnormalities in hair follicle morphogenesis, cycling, and/or structure

An update

Motonobu Nakamura, Marlon R. Schneider, Ruth Schmidt-Ullrich, Ralf Paus

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human hair disorders comprise a number of different types of alopecia, atrichia, hypotrichosis, distinct hair shaft disorders as well as hirsutism and hypertrichosis. Their causes vary from genodermatoses (e.g. hypotrichoses) via immunological disorders (e.g. alopecia areata, autoimmune cicatrical alopecias) to hormone-dependent abnormalities (e.g. androgenetic alopecia). A large number of spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice develop abnormalities in hair follicle morphogenesis, cycling, and/or hair shaft formation, whose analysis has proven invaluable to define the molecular regulation of hair growth, ranging from hair follicle development, and cycling to hair shaft formation and stem cell biology. Also, the accumulating reports on hair phenotypes of mouse strains provide important pointers to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying human hair growth disorders. Since numerous new mouse mutants with a hair phenotype have been reported since the publication of our earlier review on this matter a decade ago, we present here an updated, tabulated mini-review. The updated annotated tables list a wide selection of mouse mutants with hair growth abnormalities, classified into four categories: Mutations that affect hair follicle (1) morphogenesis, (2) cycling, (3) structure, and (4) mutations that induce extrafollicular events (for example immune system defects) resulting in secondary hair growth abnormalities. This synthesis is intended to provide a useful source of reference when studying the molecular controls of hair follicle growth and differentiation, and whenever the hair phenotypes of a newly generated mouse mutant need to be compared with existing ones.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6-29
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Dermatological Science
Volume69
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hair Follicle
Morphogenesis
Hair
Alopecia
Cytology
Immune system
Stem cells
Growth
Phenotype
Hormones
Hypotrichosis
Hypertrichosis
Growth Disorders
Defects
Alopecia Areata
Hirsutism
Mutation
Cell Biology
Publications
Immune System

Keywords

  • Hair cycle
  • Hair follicle morphogenesis
  • Knockout
  • Mouse
  • Transgenic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Dermatology

Cite this

Mutant laboratory mice with abnormalities in hair follicle morphogenesis, cycling, and/or structure : An update. / Nakamura, Motonobu; Schneider, Marlon R.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth; Paus, Ralf.

In: Journal of Dermatological Science, Vol. 69, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 6-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Nakamura, Motonobu ; Schneider, Marlon R. ; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth ; Paus, Ralf. / Mutant laboratory mice with abnormalities in hair follicle morphogenesis, cycling, and/or structure : An update. In: Journal of Dermatological Science. 2013 ; Vol. 69, No. 1. pp. 6-29.
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