Musculoskeletal pain in persons with spinal cord injury

Robert W Irwin, Jose Andres Restrepo, Andrew L. Sherman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Musculoskeletal pain in persons living with spinal cord injuries (SCIs) can be debilitating. The use of the upper extremity (UE) for mobility, transfers, and activities of daily living not only increases the risk of injury but also puts the UE at risk for more significant functional loss when injury occurs. The shoulder is the most likely source of problems; the elbow, wrist, and hand are also vulnerable to overuse injuries. The spine and lower extremities are less likely to cause problems, but they remain a significant source of problems. We discuss the most common pathologic processes, management, and treatment in the SCI population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-57
Number of pages15
JournalTopics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

Fingerprint

Musculoskeletal Pain
Spinal Cord Injuries
Upper Extremity
Cumulative Trauma Disorders
Wounds and Injuries
Pathologic Processes
Activities of Daily Living
Elbow
Wrist
Lower Extremity
Spine
Hand
Population
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Diagnosis
  • Fracture
  • Heterotopic ossification
  • Rehabilitation
  • Rotator cuff
  • Shoulder
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Treatment
  • Wrist

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Musculoskeletal pain in persons with spinal cord injury. / Irwin, Robert W; Restrepo, Jose Andres; Sherman, Andrew L.

In: Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, Vol. 13, No. 2, 01.09.2007, p. 43-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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