Multistep carcinogenesis and genital papillomavirus infection. Implications for diagnosis and vaccines

L. M. Rangel, M. Ramirez, M. Torroella, A. Pedroza, V. Ibarra, P. Gariglio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Activated cellular oncogenes (myc and ras, for example) and inactivated anti-oncogenes (p53 or Rb) participate in multistep carcinogenesis. In addition, some high risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) are also involved in uterine cervix carcinomas. Typification of HPV is important for clinical diagnosis. Unravelling the complexities of the immune system and understanding the biochemistry and molecular genetics of cellular oncogenes and tumor viruses have opened up new possibilities for vaccination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-272
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Medical Research
Volume25
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    Rangel, L. M., Ramirez, M., Torroella, M., Pedroza, A., Ibarra, V., & Gariglio, P. (1994). Multistep carcinogenesis and genital papillomavirus infection. Implications for diagnosis and vaccines. Archives of Medical Research, 25(2), 265-272.