Motivational Interviewing Training for HIV Care Physicians in Argentina: Uptake and Sustainability of an Effective Behavior Change Intervention

Violeta J. Rodriguez, John M. Abbamonte, Maria Luisa Alcaide, Nicolle L. Rodriguez Yanes, Aileen de la Rosa, Omar Sued, Diego Cecchini, Stephen M. Weiss, Deborah L. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Motivational interviewing (MI) utilizes a patient-centered approach to address patient ambivalence about treatment and has been found to improve treatment ART adherence among patients living with HIV disengaged from care. This study examined MI training for clinicians, uptake, and sustainability over time. Clinics (n = 7) with N = 38 physicians were randomized to condition (MI, Enhanced Standard of Care). Physicians completed video- recorded patient consultations at baseline and 6, 12, and 18-month follow-up. MI condition physicians had greater relational and technical scores over time and were more likely to adhere to and sustain MI over time. Overall, physicians found the MI training highly acceptable and were able to sustain their skills. Results illustrate the feasibility of MI training, implementation, and sustainment over 18 months. Findings support previous research in Argentina in which trained physicians found MI useful with challenging patients. Broader implementation of MI among HIV care physicians in Argentina is merited.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAIDS and Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Argentina
  • HIV
  • Motivational interviewing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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