Mortality and heart rate in the elderly

Role of cognitive impairment

Francesco Cacciatore, Francesca Mazzella, Pasquale Abete, Luisa Viati, Gianluigi Galizia, Daniele D'Ambrosio, Gaetano Gargiulo, Salvatore Russo, Claudia Visconti, David Della Morte, Nicola Ferrara, Franco Rengo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mortality related to heart rate (HR) increase in the elderly has not yet been well established. To ascertain the relationships among cognitive impairment (CI), mortality, and HR increase, the authors prospectively studied a random sample of elderly subjects stratified according to presence or absence of CI. Elderly subjects randomly selected in 1991 (n = 1332) were followed up for 12 years. Mortality was established in 98.1% of the subjects. When HR was stratified in quartiles (<69, 70-75, 76-80, and >80 bpm), mortality was linearly associated with increased HR in all (from 47.7 to 57.0; r2 = .43, p = .019) and in subjects without (from 41.7 to 51.1%; r2 = .50, p = .043) but not in those with CI (from 57.5 to 66.1; r2 = .20, p = .363). Cox regression analysis, adjusted for several variables, shows that HR doesn't predict mortality in all subjects (RR 0.69; 95% CI = 0.27-1.73) or in those with CI (RR 0.91; 95% CI = 0.81-1.02). In contrast, HR predicts mortality in subjects without CI (RR 1.10; 95% CI = 1.00-1.22). Hence, HR increase is a predictor of mortality in elderly subjects without CI. However, when considering all elderly subjects and those with CI, HR increase seems to have no effect on mortality. Thus, CI should be considered when focusing on HR increase as risk factor for mortality in the elderly.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-144
Number of pages18
JournalExperimental Aging Research
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Heart Rate
Mortality
Cognitive Dysfunction
Cognitive Impairment
Mortality Rate
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Aging
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Cacciatore, F., Mazzella, F., Abete, P., Viati, L., Galizia, G., D'Ambrosio, D., ... Rengo, F. (2007). Mortality and heart rate in the elderly: Role of cognitive impairment. Experimental Aging Research, 33(2), 127-144. https://doi.org/10.1080/03610730601166372

Mortality and heart rate in the elderly : Role of cognitive impairment. / Cacciatore, Francesco; Mazzella, Francesca; Abete, Pasquale; Viati, Luisa; Galizia, Gianluigi; D'Ambrosio, Daniele; Gargiulo, Gaetano; Russo, Salvatore; Visconti, Claudia; Della Morte, David; Ferrara, Nicola; Rengo, Franco.

In: Experimental Aging Research, Vol. 33, No. 2, 01.04.2007, p. 127-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cacciatore, F, Mazzella, F, Abete, P, Viati, L, Galizia, G, D'Ambrosio, D, Gargiulo, G, Russo, S, Visconti, C, Della Morte, D, Ferrara, N & Rengo, F 2007, 'Mortality and heart rate in the elderly: Role of cognitive impairment', Experimental Aging Research, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 127-144. https://doi.org/10.1080/03610730601166372
Cacciatore F, Mazzella F, Abete P, Viati L, Galizia G, D'Ambrosio D et al. Mortality and heart rate in the elderly: Role of cognitive impairment. Experimental Aging Research. 2007 Apr 1;33(2):127-144. https://doi.org/10.1080/03610730601166372
Cacciatore, Francesco ; Mazzella, Francesca ; Abete, Pasquale ; Viati, Luisa ; Galizia, Gianluigi ; D'Ambrosio, Daniele ; Gargiulo, Gaetano ; Russo, Salvatore ; Visconti, Claudia ; Della Morte, David ; Ferrara, Nicola ; Rengo, Franco. / Mortality and heart rate in the elderly : Role of cognitive impairment. In: Experimental Aging Research. 2007 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 127-144.
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