Monitoring blood coagulation with magnetoelastic sensors

Libby G. Puckett, Gary Barrett, Dimitris Kouzoudis, Craig Grimes, Leonidas G Bachas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The determination of blood coagulation time is an essential part of monitoring therapeutic anticoagulants. Standard methodologies for the measurement of blood clotting time require dedicated personnel and involve blood sampling procedures. A new method based on magnetoelastic sensors has been employed for the monitoring of blood coagulation. The ribbon-like magnetoelastic sensor oscillates at a fundamental frequency, which shifts linearly in response to applied mass loads or a fixed mass load of changing elasticity. The magnetoelastic sensors emit magnetic flux, which can be detected by a remotely located pick-up coil, so that no direct physical connections are required. During blood coagulation, the viscosity of blood changes due to the formation of a soft fibrin clot. In turn, this change in viscosity shifts the characteristic resonance frequency of the magnetoelastic sensor enabling real-time continuous monitoring of this biological event. By monitoring the signal output as a function of time, a distinct blood clotting profile can be seen. The relatively low cost of the magnetoelastic ribbons enables their use as disposable sensors. This, along with the reduced volume of blood required, make the magnetoelastic sensors well suited for at-home and point-of-care testing devices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)675-681
Number of pages7
JournalBiosensors and Bioelectronics
Volume18
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Blood Coagulation
Coagulation
Blood
Monitoring
Sensors
Blood Viscosity
Environmental Monitoring
Elasticity
Loads (forces)
Home Care Services
Blood Volume
Fibrin
Viscosity
Anticoagulants
Magnetic flux
Costs and Cost Analysis
Equipment and Supplies
Personnel
Sampling
Testing

Keywords

  • Blood coagulation
  • Clotting time
  • Magnetoelastic
  • Wireless sensors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Electrochemistry

Cite this

Monitoring blood coagulation with magnetoelastic sensors. / Puckett, Libby G.; Barrett, Gary; Kouzoudis, Dimitris; Grimes, Craig; Bachas, Leonidas G.

In: Biosensors and Bioelectronics, Vol. 18, No. 5-6, 01.05.2003, p. 675-681.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Puckett, Libby G. ; Barrett, Gary ; Kouzoudis, Dimitris ; Grimes, Craig ; Bachas, Leonidas G. / Monitoring blood coagulation with magnetoelastic sensors. In: Biosensors and Bioelectronics. 2003 ; Vol. 18, No. 5-6. pp. 675-681.
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