Money Makes the World Go 'Round: A Qualitative Examination of the Role Funding Plays in Large-Scale Implementation and Sustainment of Youth Evidence- Based Practice

Samantha L. Pegg, Lucia M. Walsh, Emily M. Becker-Haimes, Vanessa Ramirez, Amanda Jensen-Doss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Funding is posited to affect evidence-based practice implementation, yet the complex interplay between financial matters and successful implementation is understudied. This study examined stakeholder perspectives on the impact of funding in evidence-based practice implementation. All participants were key stakeholders (e.g., clinicians, case managers, agency leaders; N = 41) involved in a trauma-focused cognitive- behavioral therapy implementation effort using a community-based learning collaborative model within the community's child welfare system. Semistructured interviews were conducted and qualitatively analyzed as part of a program evaluation of the implementation effort. Funding emerged as a key theme influencing implementation within this program evaluation from the perspective of all stakeholders. Thirty-four participants (83%) independently raised funding as an important factor affecting implementation outcomes across seven specific themes: (a) the impact of privatization, (b) turfism, (c) money as a primary implementation facilitator, (d) implementation costs impacting participation, (e) burden associated with funding evaluation efforts, (f) need for reimbursement practices to align with the use of trauma-informed treatment, and (g) a sense of shared mission to serve clients above money. Recommendations for addressing these challenges are provided. Future research should examine funding qualitatively and quantitatively across diverse communities and funding systems to improve understanding of the impact of funding on implementation and, ultimately, care provided to clients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychological Services
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Evidence-Based Practice
Program Evaluation
Privatization
Wounds and Injuries
Cognitive Therapy
Child Welfare
Learning
Interviews
Costs and Cost Analysis
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Evidence-based practice
  • Finances
  • Implementation
  • Qualitative analysis
  • Youth mental health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Money Makes the World Go 'Round : A Qualitative Examination of the Role Funding Plays in Large-Scale Implementation and Sustainment of Youth Evidence- Based Practice. / Pegg, Samantha L.; Walsh, Lucia M.; Becker-Haimes, Emily M.; Ramirez, Vanessa; Jensen-Doss, Amanda.

In: Psychological Services, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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